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Scenes from Philippines' superstorm

Photo: Getty Images

The Philippines is reeling in the aftermath of one the world's most powerful storms ever. Supertyphoon Haiyan ravaged the country's central provinces late last week, reportedly killing at least 10,000 people and displacing hundreds of thousands.

Among the worst-affected regions is the island of Leyte, which has a population of around 1.5 million people, where the powerful storm is said to have destroyed 70-80 percent of buildings in its path, according to police officers.

Many provinces were left without power and telecommunications remained compromised early Monday. Survivors were described to be in desperate need of clean drinking water and food.

The supertyphoon made landfall on Friday, causing sea waters to rise 20 feet, flattening homes and triggering mudslides.

On impact, Haiyan packed sustained winds of 147 miles per hour (mph), with gusts of up to 170 mph, making in comparable to a strong Category 4 hurricane in the U.S. and nearly in the top category of 5.

Here are scenes from the devastating disaster.

By
Li Anne Wong
Posted on 11 November 2013
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Photo: Charism Sayat | AFP | Getty Images

Residents of the city of Legaspi, in Albay province south of Manila, witnessing high waves pounding the sea wall as Typhoon Haiyan hit the coast on Nov. 8, 2013.

Photo: Getty Images

Submerged cars sit in flood waters in the coastal city Tacloban, capital of the Leyte province.

Photo: Ted Alijibe | AFP | Getty Images

Residents cover their noses as they walk past dead bodies littered along a road in the coastal city of Tacloban, capital of the Leyte province, which has a population of 200,000.

Photo: Noel Celis | AFP | Getty Images

A mother weeps beside the dead body of her son at a chapel in Tacloban, capital of the Leyte province, on November 9.

There have been reports of children being ripped from their parents' arms due to the storm surge.

Photo: Jay Directo | AFP | Getty Images

Volunteers repacking relief goods at the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in Manila on November 9, for victims of Supertyphoon Haiyan.

Photo: Noel Celis | AFP | Getty Images

Rescue workers carry a woman about to give birth at a makeshift Department of Health (DOH) medical center at Tacloban airport on Nov. 9.


Photo: Ted Alijibe | AFP | Getty Images

Residents carry their looted goods in Tacloban City in the wake of Supertyphoon Haiyan.

Looting was reported to be widespread, affecting fast food chains and shopping centers, as residents in need of food and water were driven to desperation.

Photo: Getty Images

Affected residents wash their clothes on a canal in the aftermath of typhoon Haiyan on November 10, in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines.

Photo: Noel Celis | AFP | Getty Images

Residents carry a mattress taken from a hotel in Palo, on the eastern island of Leyte on Nov. 10.

Hundreds and thousands of people are reported to be displaced by Supertyphoon Haiyan and about 4 million affected in total.

Photo: Ted Alijibe | AFP | Getty Images

A resident who survived Supertyphoon Haiyan cries inside a stadium used as an evacuation center in Tacloban on Nov. 10.

Police officers expect the death toll from the supertyphoon to reach over 10,000.

Photo: Jay Directo | AFP | Getty Images

Local and foreign journalists wait at an airbase lounge for a C-130 military plane in Manila on Nov. 10, that will take them to the central city of Tacloban.


Photo: Jay Directo | AFP | Getty Images

Philippine police commandos prepare to board a C-130 military plane in Manila on Nov. 10, heading to the supertyphoon devastated city of Tacloban.

Around 15,000 soldiers have been deployed to help with rescue efforts, military spokesperson Ramon Zagala told CNBC.

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