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These jobs are drying up in 2014

On the endangered list

Steve Debenport | iStock | 360 | Getty Images

Technology has always driven the evolution of labor markets. It will continue to influence change in the job market as digital replaces physical across many sectors, a recent report suggests.

CareerCast.com released its annual "most endangered jobs" report Tuesday, and many of the jobs listed will take hits as industries flock to digital or automated technologies that require less human labor. The report, compiled by the site with data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), examines jobs that are expected to see the largest drops in hiring by 2022.

"Technology has always been and is a very active force in changing the way work is done," said John Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

He added that "the necessity for digitizing information" will continue to shape change in labor markets.

"We continue to move from an industrial and manufacturing economy to a service and information economy," Challenger said.

Scroll through to view CareerCast.com's most endangered jobs of 2014.

—By Jacob Pramuk, special to CNBC.com
Posted TK July 2014

Tax examiner and collector

John Lamb | Photodisc | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $50,440
Hiring outlook by 2022: -4 percent

Technology will render much of the work done by tax collectors and examiners obsolete. With software designed to perform the same functions at a fraction of the cost, employers can hire for fewer positions.

Printing worker

Photodisc | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $34,100
Hiring outlook by 2022: -5 percent

A move to digital reading and viewing, combined with increasing consciousness of paper waste, has reduced demand for hard copy printing. Printing companies don't need as many workers to keep up with the pace.

"Paper is a 19th and 20th century technology," Challenger said. "People who used it are changing."

Drill-press operator

Vitapix | iStock | 360 | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $32,950
Hiring outlook by 2022: -6 percent

Manufacturing jobs have slowly rebounded since the Great Recession, but still haven't come close to prerecession levels. Opportunities for drill-press operators are no exception.

Advances in drill technology compound the general lull in manufacturing, as fewer operators are needed for the same work.

Flight attendant

Jupiterimages | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $37,240
Hiring outlook by 2022: -7 percent

Many airlines have consolidated to cut costs. Fewer or smaller flights lead to fewer attendants on each flight.

Lumberjack

Tetra Images | Brand X Pictures | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $24,340
Hiring outlook by 2022: -9 percent

Given the dangerous nature of this job, and its median salary of a little under $25,000, logging may not be appealing employment even when jobs are numerous. Advances in logging technology have reduced the need for lumberjacks and lower demand for paper has cut the industry's demand overall.

Travel agent

Yuri_Arcurs | iStock | 360 | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $34,600
Hiring outlook by 2022: -12 percent

The 21st century traveler has become more independent, weaning off the advice of travel agents in favor of self-serve planning online. The highest demand remains in specialized trips, often international travel that requires considerable preparation.

Newspaper reporter

Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images News | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $37,090
Hiring outlook by 2022: -13 percent

With a wealth of free online news sources available on consumer electronics, newspaper subscriptions have dropped and some papers have contracted or closed altogether. As Web news knocks off traditional papers, many print reporters have switched to multimedia journalism or left the profession.

"Reporters aren't going away as much as they're moving online," Challenger said.

Meter reader

Tetra Images | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $36,410
Hiring outlook by 2022: -19 percent

Utility companies have started to roll out meters that can be read remotely, and the practice should only increase in the coming years. Companies can now gather data without sending any employees to the site.

Farmer

Jose A. Bernat Bacete | Moment Open | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $69,300
Hiring outlook by 2022: -19 percent

Technology has historically altered the face of agriculture, and that hasn't changed in the 21st century. As farming technology advances, established farmers can accomplish more with fewer workers.

"The need for farmers, people actually tilling the land, is decreasing," Challenger said.

Mail carrier

iStock | 360 | Getty Images

BLS annual median salary: $53,100
Hiring outlook by 2022: -28 percent

Decreasing reliance on physical mail will drive a drop in mail carriers. Instant online communication and the ease of paying bills online have contributed to lower mail volume. In turn, fewer people have been needed to transport it.