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CCTV Script 21/10/14

— This is the script of CNBC's news report for China's CCTV on October 21, Tuesday.

With the record setting drought in California heading into its fourth year... and no end in sight to the dry conditions, some breweries are getting creative to access the precious resource.

Jane Wells has more.

HOW MANY BOTTLES OF WATER IN THAT BEER ON THE WALL?

A LOT.

sot: "beer has to have water"

MORE THAN 90 PERCENT OF THAT BUD IS WATER, AND ONE BREWER SAID IT CAN TAKE 7 GALLONS OF WATER TO MAKE ONE GALLON OF BEER. THAT'S A PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA, WHERE THERE ISN'T MUCH WATER LEFT…

STANDUP: IT'S IMPACTING EVERYONE FROM FAST GROWING CRAFT BREWERS, TO BEER GIANTS, LIKE ANHEUSER BUSCH, WHICH HAS BEEN RUNNING A BREWERY IN LOS ANGELES FOR 60 YEARS.

SOT: like i said we use reclaimed water to rinse first...

HERE THEY'RE USING RECLAIMED WATER FOR CLEANING AND REPLACED THE LANDSCAPING, WHICH ALONE SAVED FIVE MILLION GALLONS.

[LUIS CAYO, ANHEUSER-BUSCH L.A. BREWERY GM] SOT; SINCE 2009 we've reduced water usage 31%, 9% in the last year. and we're targeting 10% in the following year.

[RICHARD NORGROVE, BEAR REPUBLIC BREWING PRES/CEO] SOT the wine industry has a crush once a year, and we have a crush every day if you want to use that phrase.

UP IN CLOVERDALE CALIFORNIA, BEAR REPUBLIC BREWING HAS TAKEN SIMILAR MEASURES TO CUT WATER USAGE, BUT IT DEPENDS ON THE RUSSIAN RIVER WHICH HAS TURNED INTO MORE OFA STREAM. WHEN THE BREWERY SOUGHT PERMITS TO DOUBLE IN SIZE BECAUSE OF GROWING SALES, THE CITY SAID NO WAY. NOT UNTIL WE CAN DRILL MORE WELLS. SO BEAR REPUBLIC PAID NEARLY A HALF MILLION DOLLARS IN IMPACT FEES IN ADVANCE TO GIVE CLOVERDALE THE CASH IT NEEDED TO DRILL.

[PAUL CAYLER, CLOVERDALE CITY MANAGER] sot: so we were actually able to drill these wells last october, before the third year of the drought began and became quite severe.

STILL, LONG TERM, IT MAY NOT BE ENOUGH. ALREADY SOME CRAFT BREWERS ARE EXPANDING ON THE EAST COAST, PARTLY FOR WATER.

SOT I mean can you imagine a drought like this go over the next ten years. I think you're going to see a lot more than breweries leaving this area. You're going to see major agriculture areas picking up and going somewhere else.

LEAVING CALIFORNIAN HIGH AND DRY AND CRYING IN ITS BEER. FOR CNBC ASIA/WEB: JANE WELLS, CNBC, BUSINESS NEWS, LOS ANGELES.

I'm Qian Chen, reporting from CNBC's Asian headquarters.

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