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Wall Street shaky as Greek debt talks collapse

U.S. stock index futures signaled a lower open on Tuesday, following Europe into negative territory, after talks between Greece and its euro zone partners over the country's debt broke down.

The news comes after a quiet start to the week, following Monday's close for Presidents' Day and Friday's record close for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500.

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The New York Fed's Empire State general business conditions index fell in February to 7.78 from January's reading of 9.95.

The NAHB housing market indices for the current month comes at 10:00 a.m. ET, together with December's TIC capital flows data at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Investors will also be looking ahead to Wednesday, which brings the minutes from the Federal Open Market Committee's most recent policy-setting meeting.

In oil markets, Brent crude added to recent gains, rallying beyond $62 per barrel Tuesday, as the International Energy Agency warned of supply risks to the Middle East. U.S. WTI crude was 7 cents higher at $52.84 a barrel.

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Major earnings expected on Tuesday include Medtronic, MGM Resorts, Genuine Parts, Goodyear Tire and American Campus Communities before market open.

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Agilent, Analog Devices, CF Industries, Devon Energy, Fossil and FirstEnergy are among the firms reporting after the bell.

European shares retreated Tuesday, with bourses in Europe's periphery leading markets lower. The Athens Stock Exchange fell 4 percent in the morning session as banks weighed heavily on the index.

The main bone of contention seemed to be a proposal for a six-month extension of Greece's international bailout package, which Athens described as "unacceptable." The European Central Bank is set to decide on Wednesday whether to maintain emergency lending to Greek banks, and it comes as Greece owes some large loan repayments in March.