Small Business

The worst cities to work for a small business

Worst cities to work in small biz

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A study by WalletHub ranks some of the worst cities to work for a small business in 2015. WalletHub's Jill Gonzalez looked at several metrics including industry variety, earnings and net small business job growth. Click ahead to see them. (The top 10 can be found here.)

10. Springfield, Mass.

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This metro area ranked 99th for growth in its number of small businesses, actually displaying negative numbers at -15.17 percent from 2007 to 2013.

9. Tucson, Ariz.

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Tucson was ranked 99th in its percentage of small businesses offering health insurance to employees, at just 24.3 percent. It also ranked 94th for growth in its number of small businesses, actually displaying negative numbers at -8.1 percent from 2007 to 2013.

8. Augusta, Ga.

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Augusta has only about 17 small businesses per 1,000 residents, plus the second slimmest industry variety in the country. That makes small business job opportunities much harder to find here.

7. New Haven, Conn.

New Haven, Connecticut
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This metro area has some of the lowest monthly earnings for small business employees at just $2,744 per month.

6. Bakersfield, Calif.

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Bakersfield has the fewest small businesses per 1,000 residents, at just 14. Plus, the net small business job growth from the fourth quarter of last year was -10.2 percent.

5. Fresno, Calif.

Downtown Fresno, California
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Fresno has the highest unemployment rate of any metro area in this study, at 12 percent. The median annual income was the third lowest, at just over $40,000 per year.

4. Scranton, Pa.

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There is little projected population growth projected over the next 30 years in Scranton, according to WalletHub.

3. Toledo, Ohio

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Toledo has the second lowest projected population growth at -5.3 percent, or rather, one of the highest rates of people leaving the area. Small businesses are leading the trend, declining 15.7 percent from 2007 to 2013.

2. Stockton, Calif.

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Stockton has the third fewest number of small business, at just around 15 per 1,000 residents. And the number is decreasing steadily, down almost 9 percent from 2007 to 2013.

1. Youngstown, Ohio

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Youngstown has the lowest projected population growth at -11.1 percent—the highest rate of people leaving a metro area. Small businesses are following suit, declining 9.4 percent from 2007 to 2013. Industry variety is very minimal in Youngstown, as well.

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