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Hate trying on clothes? This one's for you

The shopping experience is set for a drastic revamp as the world's first 360-degree digital mirror launches this year.

Once a customer tries an outfit on, the MemoryMirror captures a 360 degree view of it and enables users to browse through different colors and styles to make side-by-side comparisons, using hand gestures to guide the mirror.

It also provides videos of users in different looks and sizes without them having to try the new garment on, thanks to perspective-distortion-correction software. Finally, customers can share the videos through the MemoryMirror smartphone app.

Launched by 2-year old Silicon Valley startup MemoMi, the smart mirror has been heralded as the newest disruptive technology for bricks-and-mortar shops fighting off competition from e-commerce players.

MemoMi

"Consumers of the future really expect to see a consistent experience between shopping online and walking into a store and this technology can bridge these two factors together," Ofer Saban, co-founder and chief technology officer of MemoMi, told CNBC on Friday.

Consumers want the convenience of online shopping combined with the immersive and personal experience of the sales floor, and the mirror does exactly that, he added.

MemoMi already has several units throughout Europe and Asia, and is aiming for roll-out at major retailers across the U.S. this year.

On the ground use

Neiman Marcus is currently using the device in three of its flagship stores across the U.S., and says feedback has been favorable thus far.

"The initial introduction resulted in an immediate positive reaction, and we're looking forward to delivering this unique experience to more customers as we roll it out into additional stores," said Wanda Gierhart, chief marketing officer at Neiman Marcus Group.

The mirror has already made a splash in the tech world, boasting heavyweights like Intel, Sony, LG Electronics, Samsung, and IBM as business partners.

The spread of IoT

MemoMi

Salvador Nissi Vilcovsky, founder and CEO of MemoMi, promised there were more big names to come. "We are currently engaged with a few of the world's biggest brands to create new solutions based on our platform, but we can't expose their names until the launch of their projects in the next three months or so," he said.

The device is the latest to emerge from the 'Internet of Things' (IoT) phenomenon, a concept in which devices talk to one another and share data.

"MemoryMirror is great example of the Internet of Things," noted Shailesh Chaudhry, strategic marketing manager of retail at Intel. "It takes a well-known device and transforms it to deliver a completely new kind of experience that benefits both the shopper and the retailer."

But it's not the only smart mirror in town.

Panasonic recently showcased its own high-tech reflective devices at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Using an embedded camera to scan and project images of users on top of their reflection, Panasonic's mirror allows users to try out different looks by applying digital makeup and facial hair.