Power Play: Why the Fed will hike rates in September

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks at the Institute for New Economic Thinking Conference on Finance and Society at the IMF in Washington on May 6, 2015.
Kevin Lamarque | Reuters
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks at the Institute for New Economic Thinking Conference on Finance and Society at the IMF in Washington on May 6, 2015.

The big debate in the market is when the Fed will start to raise interest rates.

Even though Fed Chair Janet Yellen said the Fed is on track for liftoff this year if economic conditions improve, there are doubts that will actually happen.

Read MoreInterest rates are going higher

Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Boston Private Wealth, tells CNBC's "Power Lunch" on Thursday, he expects a rate hike in September.

"I do expect the Federal Reserve to raise their Fed Funds target by 25 basis points. I base my assumption on my belief that the economic data will continue to show modest improvements," Pavlik said.

For investors, Pavlik believes any preceding or subsequent drop in equity prices is a buying opportunity. "I believe the U.S. equity markets will enjoy a strong final three-four months rally taking the market into 2016," Pavlik said.