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The strictest states for speeding and reckless driving

In Virginia, going 90 miles an hour in a 55-mile zone has been known to earn drivers a few days in the slammer. As tough as that might seem, the state isn't even among the five strictest when it comes to enforcing speeding and reckless driving laws.

According to a new report by WalletHub, which collected data including the average increase in insurance costs after a speeding ticket and the fines related to reckless driving, Colorado is strictest on offending motorists.

Texas, on the other hand, is the most lenient—perhaps no surprise for the state that's home to the fastest freeway in the country.

Source: WalletHub

Officially, no state requires mandatory jail time for speeding, WalletHub said. But push far enough over the limit and you could find the charge changed to reckless driving. In Arkansas or North Carolina, for example, driving more than 15 mph over the speed limit is automatically considered reckless driving.

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The average maximum cost of a ticket for reckless driving is $742, according to WalletHub, with the lowest being $100 in Kentucky, Mississippi and New Mexico. The highest is approximately $5,000, in Washington state.

Eleven states have added additional penalties for so-called "aggressive driving."

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Following Colorado, the toughest places on speeding and reckless driving are Arizona, Delaware and Illinois (all tied for second); New Mexico; Virginia; Iowa and Massachusetts (tied for seventh); Alabama; and the District of Columbia.

Aside from Texas, the other most lenient states are Mississippi, Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Utah (all tied for the second-most forgiving); New Hampshire; and a six-way tie between Kentucky, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio and South Carolina.

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