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CCTV Script 06/08/15

– This is the script of CNBC's news report for China's CCTV on June 6, Thursday.

Welcome to CNBC Business Daily, I'm Qian Chen.

A piece of a wing that washed up on an Indian Ocean island beach last week was part of the wreckage of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, Malaysia said on Thursday, confirming the discovery of the first trace of the plane since it vanished last year.

We interviewed Richard Gillespie, Executive Director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), he said the confirmation is just the beginning.

[Richard Gillespie, Executive Director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery] "The first question I would have is why did it float. Metal doesn't float very well, unless it's attached to something that is bouyant, and or there's air trapped inside. Obviously, this thing floated well, so there's got to be a reason for that, and they'll be able to easily figure that out, I think. The kind of marine growth on it may give some clues as to how long it's been in the water. We don't know when this thing washed up on the beach. We know when it was found on the beach, but how long it has been there. The marine growth could tell us how long it's been in the water, and may tell us a bit about what environment it had been in."

If the part belongs to Flight 370, it could provide valuable clues to investigators trying to figure out what caused the aircraft to vanish in the first place. The nature of the damage to the debris could help indicate whether the plane broke up in the air or when it hit the water, and how violently it did so, according to Gillespie.

[Richard Gillespie, Executive Director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)] "what I would be very interested in is this forensic examination of where this thing parted company from the airplane. How did that metal fail, under what stresses, and what does that tell us about the final moments of the flight in general."

Gillespie said the piece could help investigators figure out how the plane crashed,

but whether it will help search crews pinpoint the rest of the wreckage is unclear, given the complexity of the currents in the southern Indian Ocean and the time that has elapsed since the plane disappeared.

[Richard Gillespie, Executive Director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)] "This particular piece of wreckage xxx through the ocean in the various currents the various weather conditions to end up on this island. By the way, I wouldn't be all surprised if more wreckage turns up along the coasts of Madagascar. This could tell us even more. But still we're a long way from the crash site and I would not abandon the idea that the airplane is right where they thought it was in the first place. You know, just because you searched an area and don't find something doesn't mean it's not there. It just means you didn't find it."

CNBC's Qian Chen, reporting from Singapore.

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