×

What do manspreading and a Grexit have in common?

Grexit, Brexit and manspreading – "the practice whereby a man, especially one travelling on public transport, adopts a sitting position with his legs wide apart, in such a way as to encroach on an adjacent seat or seats," in case you didn't know – may seem unlikely bedfellows.

But as of Thursday they are new entries on OxfordDictionaries.com, the free, online English dictionary from the Oxford University Press (OUP).

The inclusion of "Grexit" in the quarterly update to the online dictionary—whose content differs from the Oxford English Dictionary—is especially timely.

Brent Winebrenner | Lonely Planet Images | Getty Images

On Wednesday, Greece's former energy minister, who quit Syriza and now heads up a new anti-bailout party, told CNBC that he was prepared to lead Greece out of the euro zone if necessary.

"If it is necessary in order to implement our program, we will not hesitate to leave the euro zone and re-establish a national currency," Panagiotis Lafazanis said.

"I don't believe these actions will be hell for Greece as the euro area propagandists claim."

Other new entries in the online dictionary include awesomesauce—informal American English for something that is excellent—and the verb "to MacGyver," which is the action of making or repairing an object using improvisation.

"New words, senses, and phrases are added to OxfordDictionaries.com when we have gathered enough independent evidence from a wide range of sources to be sure that they have widespread currency in the English language," Oxford Dictionaries' Angus Stevenson said in a news release.

"We do much of this research using a range of corpora, including the Oxford English Corpus, our unique language monitoring programme that represents all types of English, from literary novels and specialist journals to everyday newspapers and magazines, and from Hansard to the language of blogs, emails, and social media."

Stevenson went on to say that the update showed how contemporary culture continued to have a significant impact on the English language.

-- Nasos Koukakis, Special to CNBC.com, contributed to this report