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The company matching you to a lover AND a job

Jim Cramer always likes to keep his finger on the pulse of emerging trends that are disrupting businesses around the globe—even if it is a private company not yet trading on the stock market.

That is why the "Mad Money" host went off the tape to take a closer look at eHarmony, a private player behind one of the most well-known online dating websites. The company says it has racked up 2 million marriages in the past 10 years with a divorce rate of 3.86 percent, far below the national average.

EHarmony has also recently expanded its business platform to include not only helping people's love lives, but their business lives as well. Could the same algorithms used to match people also help individuals find the career they love?

To find out more, Cramer spoke with eHarmony's Co-Founder, Chairman and CEO Dr. Neil Clark Warren. The CEO explained that approximately 70 percent of people in the U.S. do not like the job they currently have, which ultimately contributes to a significant amount of displacement.





Dr. Neil Clark Warren.
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
Dr. Neil Clark Warren.

Dr. Warren added that there are four things that eHarmony looks for when matching an individual to the right job.

No. 1 Does the individual fit with the culture of the company?
No. 2 A match for the right skills and aptitudes for the particular job that they are applying for
No. 3 A personality fit between the applicant and the supervisor
No. 4 There are typically 10 people around that supervisor in the workplace. Does the individual also get along with those people?

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"You have those four things, than you'll stay at that job for a long time," Dr. Warren said.

Expanding into job matching could also prove to be very beneficial to the company's bottom line, as the CEO stated that there is an $80 billion market for job matching, far larger than the $4 billion market for matching people. But that will not be obtained without hard work.

"It is 10 times as hard to match people for a job as it is to match them for marriage," Dr. Warren added. (Tweet This)

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