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How Apple disrupted corporate IT: Box CEO

If there's one thing that can bring together disruptive entrepreneurs at Box and old-line engineers Apple, it's mobility for enterprise tools, Aaron Levie said Tuesday.

"What Apple has done is enabled every individual to have a tablet and a phone that needs to be able to connect to new information from many different platforms," Levie, co-founder and CEO of Box, told CNBC's "Power Lunch." "Our growth at Box has been driven by the push to mobility, which has been core to what Apple has done over the past five years."

Box, a start-up that focuses on cybersecurity and cloud computing for businesses, is in the midst of BoxWorks, a star-studded annual customer conference in San Francisco. Levie sat down with Apple CEO Tim Cook at Tuesday's BoxWorks session, where they discussed Apple's move into enterprise, including a partnership with Box.

Apple's flagship device, the iPhone, is primarily a consumer product. But the company has increasingly looked toward enterprise customers for revenue, Cook said. At the event, he took a playful jab at competitors Android and BlackBerry, while discussing stronger ties with Microsoft.

Though Apple's Macintosh once competed with Microsoft's Windows, Levie said Apple has separated itself by specifically pushing enterprises to be more innovative and mobile friendly.

"What a lot of people don't recognize is how important and instrumental Apple devices have been for the transformation of IT over the past three or five years," Levie told CNBC. "If you go back 10 to 15 years ago, most of corporate IT was a closed network with personal computers from Windows as the primary operating system and the way that we worked."

Aaron Levie, CEO, Box
Scott Mlyn | CNBC
Aaron Levie, CEO, Box

Both Box and Apple recently announced new products targeted at business owners.

Earlier this month, Apple revealed the iPad Pro, with a larger screen, faster processing speed and a high-powered stylus called "Apple Pencil." iPad Pro demonstrations focused on how designers or health-care professionals might use the device.

Similarly, Box announced Tuesday increased cloud storage options for high-definition and 3-D files and medical files. It also introduced a new pricing scheme and an open platform for customers to build Box applications on top of the existing platform.

—CNBC's Deborah Findling contributed to this report.