Paris raids, flight diversions: What we know so far

Here are the latest developments in the aftermath of the devastating terrorist attacks in Paris.

We'll be adding to this story as news develops throughout the day.


Police launch raid in northern Paris

French police carried out a large-scale operation in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis on Wednesday morning, which lasted nearly six hours.

Officials said Abdelhamid Abaaoud — believed to be the mastermind who coordinated and ordered the attacks — was the target of the raids, which saw at least one woman killed after she detonated a suicide bomb. Speaking in Paris, French President Francois Hollande confirmed that two people died during the operation, the second being a man according to the Paris prosecutor, though further details have yet to be released.

The Paris prosecutor confirmed five people were arrested, with Reuters reporting two more were taken into custody. It is not yet clear whether Abaaoud was among those detained.

Five officers and one passerby are said to have suffered injuries.

French Cabinet to debate emergency powers

A French Cabinet meeting Wednesday considered extending the state of emergency to three months, which would mean changing the country's constitution.

The move will give the government powers to control broadcasts, set curfews and restrict the movement of people. Security services will also be able to launch house raids without needing approval from the courts.

The bill will then be presented to the National Assembly — France's lower house— on Thursday, followed by a debate by the Senate on Friday.


Flights diverted after bomb threats

Air France diverted two Paris-bound flights overnight after receiving anonymous threats after takeoff.

Those flights — from Washington and Los Angeles — landed safely in Halifax, Canada, and Salt Lake City. The planes carried 234 and 473 passengers, respectively.

Air France said local authorities were taking time to inspect the planes, passengers and luggage, adding that an investigation would be launched to identify the source of the call.

German football match canceled

A soccer match between Germany and the Netherlands in Hannover, Germany, was called off two hours before kickoff Tuesday night over bomb concerns.

It came just days after the game between France and Germany was thrown into turmoil after it was targeted by suicide bombs during the Paris attacks.

At a press conference later Tuesday, authorities reported that no explosives had been found, and no arrests were made. However, Stephan Weil, premier of Lower Saxony, told Reuters they had identified "concrete dangers" sourced from "confidential and secret information."

...But France's soccer team returns

France's national team returned to the soccer pitch in London's Wembley Stadium on Tuesday night, in its first game since Friday's attacks.

The British and French teams broke tradition, gathering together, putting arms around each others' shoulders and observing a moment of silence to honor the attack's victims.


U.S. lawmakers raise concerns over refugees

White House officials held a joint call with 34 state governors on Tuesday to reassure representatives that Syrian refugees would be rigorously screened before entering the U.S.

It comes after a number of governors said they would resist allowing Syrian refugees in their state over fears that Islamic State terrorists could be posing as refugees.

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan now plans to introduce a bill that could suspend the federal refugee program.

— Reuters contributed to this report.