A week on: The world has its say on Paris attacks

The terror attacks, the events which took place in Paris last Friday have shaken the world to its core.

Not only did people all over show their support for France, but people were quick to speakout against the terror.

One week on, CNBC takes a look at what's been said:

President Francois Hollande

"In my determination to combat terrorism, I want France to remain itself. The barbarians who attack France would like to disfigure it. They will not make it change," Hollande said to lawmakers Monday.

"They must never be able to spoil France's soul."


Jean Jullien

Late on Friday night, French graphic designer, Jean Jullien posted his sketch "Peace for Paris" which soon became the symbol of unity and support for Paris.

Dalai Lama

"We cannot solve this problem only through prayers. I am a Buddhist and I believe in praying. But humans have created this problem, and now we are asking God to solve it. It is illogical. God would say, solve it yourself because you created it in the first place," the Dalai Lama told German media outlet, Deutsche Welle.

"We need a systematic approach to foster humanistic values, of oneness and harmony. If we start doing it now, there is hope that this century will be different from the previous one."


US President Barack Obama

"France is our oldest ally, the French people have stood shoulder to shoulder with the United States time and again," Obama told the press late on Friday.

"We stand together with them in the fight against terrorism and extremism. Paris itself represents the timeless values of human progress. Those who think they can terrorize the people of France or the values that they stand for are wrong."


Saba Ahmed

Republican Muslim Coalition's president and founder, Saba Ahmed came onto FOX News' "The Kelly File" earlier this week. She came onto the program to defend Muslim Americans' right to worship while wearing an American flag hijab.

Father to son: 'They have guns… we have flowers'

A child told a reporter from France's Le Petit Journal that the attacks in Paris were performed by the "bad guys" and was anxious that his family would have to relocate. His father consoled him in the following conversation.

Boy: "The bad guys aren't very nice. And we really have to be careful because we have to change homes."

Father: "No, don't worry, we don't have to change homes. France is our home."

Boy: "But there are bad guys, Daddy!"

Father: "Yes, but there are bad guys everywhere."

Boy: "They have guns, they can shoot at us because they have guns and are bad."

Father: "Well, they have guns, but we have flowers."

Father: "See all the flowers? They're to fight against the guns."


Pope Francis

Eagles of Death Metal

"Although bonded in grief with the victims, the fans, the families, the citizens of Paris, and all those affected by terrorism, we are proud to stand together, with our new family, now united by a common goal of love and compassion," the band wrote on their Facebook page.

"Vive la musique, vive la liberté, vive la France, and vive EODM."


Karuna Ezara Parikh

Blogger KarunaEzara Parikh posted a poem on social media, highlighting the similardevastations which were taking place in Beiruit and Baghdad.

Donald Trump

"We're going to have to get intellectually much smarter if we're going to win this and we have to be much tougher. We're going to have to give up certain privileges that we've always had," Trump told CNBC Monday.

"We're going to have to knock 'em out and knock 'em out hard, because otherwise this is going to be a cancer that festers and festers, and only gets worse."


Cecily Strong

"Paris is the city of light, and here in New York City we know that light will never go out. Our love and support is with everyone there tonight. We stand with you," Strong said on NBC's Saturday Night Live.

By CNBC's Alexandra Gibbs, follow her on Twitter @AlexGibbsy.