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3 stocks that history says outperform the market in December

Only 21 trading days remain in 2015 and one expert on seasonality says there's only one way to finish out the year: stick with what's working.

"The leading [industry] groups heading into December have typically outperformed in the month of December," Bespoke Investment Group co-founder Paul Hickey said on "Fast Money" Tuesday.

Hickey found that in most instances, the outperformers in the first 11months of the year continued to outperform in December, while the names that underperformed continued to lag.

"It's the first time in this bull market that breadth is evenly split amongst groups," Hickey pointed out. While 11 industry groups are positive heading into December, 13 of the 24 groups are negative. And as Hickey points out in his Bespoke 'B.I.G Tips' report, "investors are much more likely to gravitate towards the winners rather than trying to find a bargain in the losers."

According to Hickey there are three stocks that history says are poised to outperform in December: Stanley Black & Decker, Lab Corp of America and Zions Bancorp.

On average, when Stanley Black & Decker is outperforming heading into year-end, the stock yields 7 percent in December and trades positively 100 percent of the time.

When Zions Bancorp is outperforming, that stock averages a 4.7 percent return in December and trades positively 77 percent of the time.

And on average when Lab Corp of America is trading positively into year-end, the stock returns 5.3 percent in December and trades positively 90 percent of the time.

Whilr looking at historical trends can often be valuable, Hickey notes that stock performance is just one component of a larger algorithm.

"Seasonalities can be taken as one step of a process. You have to look at other things," said Hickey. "We haven't had a period where the Fed is going to be hiking rates and Europe is going to be cutting rates since 1994 and before that you have to go back decades. It's a multi-part process and seasonality is just one part of it."

That being said, according to Hickey, most investors have already priced in a rate hike to some degree.