Super Bowl 50: Coldplay to headline halftime show

Coldplay is set to take the stage at Super Bowl 50's halftime show in 2016.

Coldplay perform onstage during the 2015 American Music Awards.
Kevin Mazur | WireImage | Getty Images
Coldplay perform onstage during the 2015 American Music Awards.

Coldplay's frontman, Chris Martin said in a promotional video on Twitter that the band was so "excited, honored and thrilled" to play the halftime show.

"This is the greatest moment in our band's life," Martin said, adding that the band was "going to give it everything we have."

The timing makes sense. The multi-Grammy award winning rock band released their seventh studio album, "A Head Full of Dreams" on Friday, with a range of guest track collaborators, including Beyoncé, Noel Gallagher and Tove Lo.

In previous halftime performances, it's common for acts to bring other artists on stage to complete the halftime numbers. While no supporting acts have been announced yet, speculation is already surfacing as to who this could be.

Before Coldplay confirmed their performance, rumors were circulating that Adele, Bruno Mars or Maroon 5 would take the coveted slot. In October, sources told E! News that Coldplay amongst other acts was being discussed by the National Football League (NFL).

Previous acts to play the halftime slot include Katy Perry, Beyoncé, Madonna and fellow British musicians, The Who and The Rolling Stones.

In 2015, 114.4 million viewers tuned in to watch the Super Bowl XLIX on NBC, delivering the largest television audience in U.S. history, with its halftime performance by Katy Perry, being seen by 118.5 million viewers.

2016's game is expected to draw big crowds, with it being the Super Bowl's 50th year. In August, CBS—which is broadcasting next year's show—revealed in an earnings call that advertisers who wanted airtime were paying as much as $5 million for 30 seconds.

Super Bowl 50 will take place at California's Levi's Stadium on February 7, 2016.

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By CNBC's Alexandra Gibbs, follow her @AlexGibbsy and @CNBCi