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How to winterize your portfolio? Think Netflix and chill

It's been a stormy start to the year for both markets and the weather, but you may be able to make the most of a cold situation by winterizing your portfolio with blizzard stocks.

Since 2000, there have been 13 major snowstorms, as classified by the National Climate Data Center.

Using big data analytics firm Kensho, we looked for the best stocks to buy around blizzards.

No one wants to be snowed in with no way out. So ahead of a big storm, preparation is key. Companies that sell bigger ticket snow management items typically see a pop one week before a major storm.

Douglas Dynamics sells snowplows and salt spreaders and Arctic Cat makes snowmobiles. Both have traded positive more than 80 percent of the time in this period, and their average returns far outperform that of the S&P 500.

And if you do happen to be snowed in, you better have supplies. Historically, Costco has also reliably seen gains ahead of a storm.

After a blizzard, investors bet that most of us want stay healthy, warm and do a little binge watching.

JC Penney has a large selection of men's and women's winter coats, Kohl's sells everything from warm clothes to vitamins and Netflix has, well, "House of Cards" and "Making a Murderer." These names, along with Men's Wearhouse and CVS Health, have seen outsized gains one week after a major snowstorm.

And the best blizzard stock of them all may be no surprise. When the snow and cold weather hit, some folks want to avoid the snow altogether and they may head to Priceline.com to book a ticket to somewhere warmer.

Buying Priceline.com one week ahead of a major and selling one week after has been profitable more than 90 percent of the time.

But avoid Expedia. Its record has been far less reliable and has lost ground on average.

As always, timing is important. These stocks typically see a pop around major blizzards—but that doesn't mean you'll get lasting returns.

But if you do want to trade the storm, consider these snow-proof names to get warm up your portfolio.

Disclosure: NBC Universal, the parent company of CNBC, is a minority investor in Kensho.