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Topshop’s Green on working with Beyoncé, Panama Papers

If you've ever wanted to dress like renowned superstar Beyoncé, now's your chance.

From Thursday, Beyoncé's "Ivy Park" active-wear collection will launch in selected Topshop outlets and high-end department stores in over 50 countries worldwide, after the singer teamed up with business mogul, Sir Philip Green.

The reported 200-piece fashion line will work around fitness and leisure-wear — such as jackets, crop-tops and leggings — and in an area in which, until Beyoncé came along, Arcadia Group's chairman admitted Topshop had not got fully involved in.

"For whatever reason, Topshop hasn't really got into this whole sector that's really on fire. Most people now are wearing these pants or leggings as well as denim... it's now become a way of life, and for whatever reason we hadn't got into that, and then we developed that concept and then we started," Green said to CNBC's Tania Bryer.

Stuart C. Wilson | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

"Beyoncé was really engaged in how we developed it together; we had lots of meeting and she wanted to know about the fit and this and that. She saw every piece on, and she tried it all on. So it was a real long hard slog to get to (the launch)."

When it comes to working with the renowned singer, Green said Beyoncé "really got engaged" in making sure the products worked and fitted properly, adding that she was "a perfectionist" when it came to her work.

'Not involved in Panama'

Green is no stranger to tax controversies. The billionaire has been scrutinized several times over his taxes in the past, due to Arcadia Group — which owns the Topshop brand — having been registered to his wife, Tina Green, who is a Monaco resident. However, Green has said consistently that he and his company pay all their taxes owed in Britain.

When asked about the Panama Papers leak, Green said he didn't know enough about it to have a view on the topic, but underlined that he wasn't involved in the scandal.

"I don't think (the Panama Papers is) about blame. You know everyone is sort of suddenly tarred in this sort of (event).

"Everybody sets up their businesses, or people set things up in a certain way. … Do people go out intentionally to set things up illegally? I wouldn't have thought so. So people take different views, they say two views make a market."

"I'm not involved in Panama."