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Prince’s Paisley Park estate to become Graceland-style museum: Report

When he was alive, Prince made hundreds of millions of dollars — for record companies, concert venues and others. That much is certain. What's less clear is how much he left behind and who'll come forward to claim it.

Prince had no will, his sister said in court documents filed on Tuesday in state court in Carver County, Minnesota. Tyka Nelson petitioned for a special administrator to oversee Prince's estate, the documents showed.

Paisley Park, the Minnesota home and studio complex of the late legendary musician, could be turned into a museum, according to his brother-in-law, Maurice Phillips.

"We will turn Paisley Park into a museum in Prince's memory," he said, according to The Sun, a U.K. tabloid newspaper.

Singer and musician Prince
Bertrand Guay | AFP | Getty Images
Singer and musician Prince

"It would be for the fans. He was all about the fans — this would remember his music, which is his legacy."

"Prince was always private but would have wanted his music remembered," Phillips added.

The pioneering artist Prince, passed away at his Paisley Park residence in Chanhassen, Minnesota, last Thursday. He was 57. An autopsy has been carried out, but the full results have yet to be published.

Other famous estates owned by late music legends have been transformed and made open to the public, including Elvis Presley's Graceland mansion in Memphis, and Bob Marley's former residence—and now museum—in Kingston, Jamaica.

Music fans visit a memorial outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 22, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota.
Scott Olson | Getty Images News | Getty Images
Music fans visit a memorial outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 22, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota.

Prince's longtime collaborator Sheila E., echoed similar thoughts in an interview with news site Entertainment Tonight, saying the late musician had originally been working on this idea.

"We're hoping to make Paisley what (Prince wanted) it to be. (He) was working on it being a museum," Sheila E. said to Entertainment Tonight.

"He's been gathering memorabilia and stuff from all the tours, like my drums and his motorcycle."

The musician was a global success, selling tens of millions of albums during his career, and received several Grammys and other prestigious awards for his contribution to the arts world.

To read the full article by The Sun, click here.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.