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Want to tackle post-Brexit racism? Wear a safety pin

A British flag flutters in front of a window in London on June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union.
Reinhard Krause | Reuters
A British flag flutters in front of a window in London on June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union.

The hashtag #safetypin was trending in the U.K. on Wednesday following the launch of an online campaign against the reported rise in alleged racist attacks since the country voted to leave the European Union last week.

Twitter users posted photos of themselves wearing safety pins, in solidarity with those who said they had experienced racist attacks since Friday's Brexit decision.




The increase is such that UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein on Tuesday urged British authorities to "act to stop these xenophobic attacks and to ensure that all those suspected of racist and anti-foreigner attacks and abuses are prosecuted."

UK Prime Minister David Cameron, who resigned from his post following an unsuccessful campaign to remain in the EU, said in the statement on Monday that Britain "will not tolerate intolerance."

British residents and immigrants alike have posted videos of alleged racist encounters. In one from earlier this week, an American man who later said he had resided in the U.K. for 18 years was verbally abused on a tram in Manchester.

Since Friday, the Muslim Council of Britain said it had received details of 100 "hate incidents".

The Cambridge News reported that cards reading " Leave the EU/No more Polish vermin", had been distributed in an area of Cambridge - including outside schools - just hours after the result of the EU referendum was announced on Friday.

Also on Friday, ten German-made cars including BMWs and Audis were vandalized in London and daubed in swastikas and offensive images, reported London newspaper The Evening Standard, and a Polish social and cultural center was vandalized over the weekend with graffiti that read "Go home".

During the highly contentious Brexit campaign, the leave side made retaining control of migration into the U.K. the main message of its campaign.


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