×

Europeans fear Brexit more than Britons: Report

Spaniards, Italians and Poles are more scared of a hit to their countries' economies from Brexit than Britons are about the impact on the U.K. economy, a survey from market research firm Mintel showed on Thursday.

The survey of over 7,000 people across Europe found almost half (48 percent) of Spaniards thought Brexit would have a "somewhat" or "extremely" negative impact on their own economy, as did 41 percent of Italians and Poles.


Photographer | Collection | Getty Images

However, only 39 percent of Britons expected the U.K.'s vote to leave the European Union (EU) last month to knock the British economy.

"The data … shows that British consumers are much more upbeat about their prospects than their counterparts in other key European markets," Toby Clark, director of research for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at Mintel, said in a news release on the survey on Thursday.

Thirty-six percent of Germans thought Brexit would be negative for the German economy and 31 percent of French people thought it would be bad for France.

Share of Europeans who think Brexit will knock their home economy:

  • Spain: 48%
  • Italy: 41%
  • Poland: 41%
  • UK: 39%
  • Germany: 36%
  • France: 31%

"It's clear that the vote has unsettled people, but in the U.K., especially, people separate the impact that Brexit will have on the economy as a whole, and what it means for their own finances," Clark said.

"For the moment, at least, five years of steady economic growth and falling unemployment means that many people feel well-insulated from the potential downsides of the vote," he added.

Mintel's survey was conducted online between June 28 and July 5, after the U.K. public voted to leave the EU on June 23.

On Thursday, the CEO of Anglo-Dutch consumer goods giant, Unilever, told CNBC that Brexit was "not good for anybody." He added that U.K. politicians had "failed terribly" to explain to the public what leaving the EU actually entailed.

The International Monetary Fund cut its U.K. growth outlook for 2016 and 2017 on Tuesday in the light of the Brexit vote. It now sees the U.K. economy expanding by 1.7 percent this year and 1.3 percent in 2017.

Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.