Entrepreneurs

Canadian business offering a job and 2 acres of land got an overwhelming response

Whycocomagh, Bras D'Or Lake, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Barrett & MacKay | Getty Images
Whycocomagh, Bras D'Or Lake, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The Farmer's Daughter Country Market has had to stop picking up the telephone.

"Due to the overwhelming response we have received with regards to our job offer, we are unable to return phone calls," the office voicemail says. The response is impressive, given that its jobs will only pay between $10.70 to $12.00 an hour.

But the job offer is padded with more than cash: In exchange for relocating to the small, remote island in Nova Scotia, Canada, a job at The Farmer's Daughter Country Market comes with two free acres of land, which the employee will own outright after five years of work.

Immediately upon arriving, new hires will have access to the land to put a home on. There's a road, "but living would be off the grid," say The Farmer's Daughter Country Market management, in a follow-up post responding to questions. Residents would need to use solar and wind power and heat the home with wood. It's a simple, community-oriented outdoor life.

A few weeks back, the Canadian general store posted that it was searching for job applicants on its Facebook page. The owners of the store say they had hired as many locals as they could, but due to a small population, the only way they could hire more employees is to entice people to move there.

The offer of land is working. So far, the Facebook post advertising the job and land offer has received 6,600 "likes" and 4,200 comments, and more than 3,100 people have applied, according to a CBC News article.

Maybe it's Trump. Or maybe it's the stress of living in an ever-connected world. Whatever it is, lots of folks seem ready to drop their current reality and settle into the rural town of Whycocomagh in Nova Scotia.

"Incredibly tempting to leave this rat race of a city I have been living in for the past decade," said Adriano Belmonte, in response to the posting, who also asked that his application be considered.

"As a single woman, I would love to do something like this. I'm getting fed up with all of the cement of Montreal, Quebec and I'm wanting to return back to back to my roots," said Karen Snair, another responder.

Another responder made a full-on pitch: "Looking to move your way. Actually had a meal in your place a few years ago on vacation, have friends at Christmas Island," said Markuz Gunn. "My background is carpentry, my better half is retired from the hotel management field, with great baking skills. I also play about a dozen different instruments. We have been vacationing in Nova Scotia with our trailer every summer and have decide we must move to your area."

The initial job post went up at the very end of August, and The Farmer's Daughter Country Market made its first round of three new hires in mid September.

The new employees were eager to get started. "I am so thrilled to be heading to Whycocomagh," said Trish Tait in response to the Facebook post announcing her hire. "People I know from all across Canada are just as excited about this new opportunity as I am. I feel very fortunate and can't wait to get there to be a part of the Farmer's Daughter Country Market. See you all soon."

Sonja Andersen and Kerry Walkins were also hired.

Managers had a hard time picking candidates. "The hardest part of this journey has been trying to choose. So many of you would be wonderful to have as co-workers and neighbours. We wish we had way more jobs!" the management said in another Facebook post.

To be sure, more people expressed interest in the jobs than there were opportunities available. But The Farmer's Daughter Country Market will be bringing on another three to four people in the Spring, so there's still time to apply.

Note: The jobs are only available to those who can already legally work in Canada, a fact which has left many U.S. residents pretty bummed.