×

Pence and Kaine clash on 'homegrown terrorism' during VP debate

Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence (R) and Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine speak during the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016.
Jewel Samad | AFP | Getty Images
Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence (R) and Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine speak during the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence and Virginia U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine clashed briefly during Tuesday's vice presidential debate on how to defend against "homegrown terrorism" threats, with neither of them offering any real solutions to the growing problem.

Both vice presidential candidates argued during Tuesday's vice presidential debate that more must be done to protect Americans against "homegrown terrorism" threats, such as the Orlando mass shooting and the New York/New Jersey bombings. Both of which were carried out by U.S. citizens and legal immigrants.

The discussion then pivoted to the issue of immigration of Syrian refugees.

Pence reaffirmed Donald Trump's proposed "extreme vetting of immigrants from parts of the world that export terrorists." The Indiana governor added that he and the Republican presidential nominee share a commitment to suspend the Syrian refugee program in the interest of the safety and security of the American people.

Kaine, however, reminded Pence of Monday's federal appellate court decision that struck down one of his plans to block funding to organizations aimed at resettling Syrian refugees, citing it was "discriminatory." The decision specifically refutes Pence's belief that some refugees were sent to Syria by ISIS to engage in terrorism, and now seek to infiltrate the United States. The court refuted the governor saying, "no evidence of this belief has been presented...it is nightmare speculation."

Kaine argued Pence's plan was "anti-ethical" to discriminate based on country of origin, and said he and Hillary Clinton will vet refugees based on "whether they are dangerous or not."