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Johnson & Johnson CEO explains why America should hire more veterans in business

Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky has made hiring veterans a priority for recruitment, as many are looking for employment and find it hard to translate their military skills into what big business is looking for.

Of the approximate 45,000 employees that Johnson & Johnson has in the U.S., over 5 percent are veterans.

"They touch all aspects of our business, and frankly, we couldn't do what we do without the great leadership, the great work of veterans," Gorsky told the "Mad Money" host on Thursday.

Not only is Gorsky the CEO of the world's largest healthcare company, but he is also a retired Army captain and graduate of military academy West Point in New York.





Alex Gorsky on Mad Money.
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
Alex Gorsky on Mad Money.

Johnson & Johnson has taken on supporting initiatives like American Corporate Partners, which assists veterans in their careers, and the Travis Manion Foundation, which provides assistance to veterans and families of the fallen. Johnson & Johnson is also the official healthcare partner of the United Service Organization.

According to Gorsky, his company has made veterans a priority in the recruitment process. This includes ensuring employees are trained and developed to understand the backgrounds of those in the military, creating a welcoming environment with mentorship and coaching, and being able to translate what was done in the military into a business situation.

"It starts really with character with things like integrity. The things they learn at the military academy: duty, honor, country, the honor code. It's hard work, it's problem solving, it's critical thinking, it's leadership. All those things, that's what we need more of in business," Gorsky said.


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