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Forget it, Democrats. The Electoral College will never be repealed

Protestors demonstrate against President-elect Donald Trump outside Independence Hall November 13, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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Protestors demonstrate against President-elect Donald Trump outside Independence Hall November 13, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Now that it looks like Hillary Clinton did indeed win the popular vote over Donald Trump, Democrats and Left Wing activists are loudly calling to repeal the Electoral College. Former Attorney General Eric Holder even appeared on national TV Friday night promising to work to get rid of it. It just doesn't seem fair to so many Americans that the candidate who got the most overall votes isn't the winner. But let's make something really clear: We're never getting rid of the Electoral College. There isn't even the remotest chance.

First, let's look at the sheer logistics. Abolishing the Electoral College would require a Constitutional Amendment. To do that, an amendment must first be proposed either by the Congress with a two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a constitutional convention called for by two-thirds of the State legislatures. Because Representatives and Senators from the smaller states make up more than a third of the Congress, that's really already a dead letter.

But let's check our math: Two-thirds of the full 435-member House of Representatives is 290 votes. And even if every Representative in every large Democratic Party-controlled state voted for the amendment, it wouldn't be anywhere near the 290 votes needed. And that's in the House, where the larger states are more heavily represented.

In the Senate, where every state gets two seats no matter the size, you'd need to find at least nine of the 42 Senators who represent states with six or fewer electoral votes to vote against their own interests and join 100 percent of the 58 Senators who come from those bigger states to vote to abolish the Electoral College. That's not going to happen.

"The Electoral College was just one of the many safeguards the Framers of the Constitution installed to make sure essential individual rights could never be voted away by the tyranny of a simple majority."

The convention of the states is an even bigger stretch, as you'd need to have 33 states, 12 of which have fewer than 10 electoral votes, to go along. Dream on. Simply from a procedural point of view, you can really argue that there is no safer section of our Constitution than the Electoral College. It's continued existence is simply too important to too many states. Someone like former AG Holder should really know better and focus his efforts on a fight he can win.

But it goes beyond that. Because a lot of Americans, no matter where they live, aren't too keen on the idea of the concerns of the big city-dwellers drowning out the issues important to the farmers and coal miners and autoworkers of this country. Just look at the interesting nature of just about every one of the eleven or so swing states.

From Arizona to Colorado to Ohio to Wisconsin to Michigan, they each have an delicate population balance coming from large urban areas, medium sized cities, and rural areas. The battleground state of Ohio is an especially exquisite composite of the entire country with elements of the farm belt, rust belt, military bases, and upper middle class urban yuppie life all in one.

Thus, you can't even win those swing states without addressing the issues that affect many of the smaller states the candidates from both parties usually never bother to visit. The Electoral College actually keeps our presidential candidates more in tune with more diverse parts of our population than the popular vote ever could. Without it, the candidates would just spend their time visiting and catering to the concerns of people in cities like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, etc.

And finally, the Electoral College was just one of the many safeguards the Framers of the Constitution installed to make sure essential individual rights could never be voted away by the tyranny of a simple majority. In case you haven't noticed, the political preferences of a large majority of voters in most of the major cities are the same.

The concerns of even millions of different people tend to conform into near group-think when they're jammed into the same relatively small geographic area. Each of the top five cities in the U.S. all voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton by at least 72 percent last Tuesday. So much for diversity. To really get voices heard, candidates need to be forced to spread out over the country. The Electoral College ensures just that.

America's news media, entertainment media, Corporate America, and academia already ensure that the urban and white collar elite in this country are well represented and protected economically and culturally. But the entire country needs political tools like the Electoral College to make sure all of the people are heard. Luckily, the very people the anti-Electoral College forces need to destroy it are the people who just so happen to need the Electoral College the most. And that's why it's here to stay.

Commentary by Jake Novak, CNBC.com senior columnist. Follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.

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