Make It

Michael Lewis endorses a strategy for getting out of anything you don't want to do

Michael Lewis, author of best-sellers "The Big Short" and "Moneyball," has come out with a new potential masterpiece: "The Undoing Project."

The book is a joint biography of Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, two trailblazing Israeli-American psychologists.

Tversky, who died in 1996, and Kahneman are "unbelievably quirky characters," Lewis tells CNBC on Power Lunch.

Michael Lewis participates in a discussion at George Washington University on April 4, 2014.
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Michael Lewis participates in a discussion at George Washington University on April 4, 2014.

Tversky in particular "had this preternatural ability to never do anything he didn't want to do," Lewis explains.

"He would look at his mail, and if he didn't want to open it, he'd toss it in the garbage can. He had a what can they do to me? rule. If they can't do anything to me, I'm just going to throw this stuff away."

His advice for anyone looking to get out of doing anything they didn't want to do is simple: It could be "a board meeting or a TV show," Lewis explains. "He said, 'Don't worry about making up an excuse for not being there. Just get up and start walking, and it's amazing how quickly your mind will formulate the words as to why you have to leave.'"

While Lewis hasn't necessarily walked out of any boardroom meetings recently, the strategy "actually has come in very handy already at some parties," he says.