Money

18 things worth paying extra for

If you're trying to build wealth, cutting back on unnecessary expenses is a smart place to start. But sometimes, it's worth it in the long run to splurge. After all, taking the cheap route isn't so cost effective when you have to replace the item two months later.

While everyone's priorities are different, here are 18 items that are generally worth spending a little extra on.

A blazer or well-made suit

A nice, well-fitted blazer can make any outfit look professional and work-appropriate.

"Buying a good blazer is important because it's such an easy way to elevate an outfit," Tiffany Yannetta, shopping director for fashion website Racked.com, tells CNBC. "The upper half of your body is what people see the most — more than your pants or your shoes."

Expect to spend roughly $90 to $200 on a quality garment that fits perfectly, she says. And if a high-caliber item still needs a tweak, spend the money to have it tailored.

While $200 might seem like a lot to spend on one item of clothing, if you wear it regularly, the cost becomes more reasonable quickly.

Tires

The right set of tires can last up to 70,000 miles — that's years on the road. While price doesn't necessarily correspond with quality here, it's worth taking the time to do your research. Don't skimp on cheap or old tires that could threaten the safety of your car.

487667598
Helmut-Seisenberger | Getty Images

A coffee maker

Cutting out that $5 daily latte is a surefire way to save money. But if your homemade cup of joe doesn't satisfy you, you're likely to hit up Starbucks. Putting in a little more cash upfront for a high-quality coffee maker will help you save down the line.

A good education

Despite the rising cost of college, many still consider it a necessity that's well worth the price. It's an investment in yourself and your future.

As CNBC previously reported, research from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows those with less than an associate's degree fare worse on average than workers with post-graduate credentials.

A plunger

Discovering that your cheap plunger can't get the job done is not a lesson you want to learn the hard way. Buy a sturdy one the minute you move into a new place.

Pet insurance

With typical premiums of about $25 a month and payouts of around 80 percent of medical expenses, pet insurance can save pet owners thousands if their furry friend has an unexpected medical issue.

Think about it this way: If you'd be willing to pay the price for an expensive, yet life-saving, surgery for your cat or dog, it's a smart idea to protect yourself ahead of time.

Wash and fold laundry

Paying someone else to do your laundry might seem like an over-the-top luxury. But what it costs in money, it saves in time, and sometimes that's far more valuable.

Direct flights

When planning a vacation, booking a flight with a layover or two might seem like a pain-free way to save a few bucks on airfare. But delays and missed connections can add undue stress and frustration to your trip. Ponying up the extra fare for a direct flight automatically eliminates potential headaches.

166956649
Michael H/Getty Images

A supportive desk chair

Especially if you work an office job, you'll be sitting in the same chair day in and day out, so you want it to be comfortable and supportive. Choosing a well-made, ergonomic chair can help prevent back, neck and shoulder pain. And as Inc. points out, a comfortable chair can also promote creativity and bolster your professionalism.

While you're at it, it's a good idea to make sure your desk is the correct height as well.

A mattress

A good night's sleep is invaluable to your productivity, and that makes a sturdy mattress worth the investment.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos swears by getting a full eight hours. "Mostly, as any of us go through our lives, we don't need to maximize the number of decisions we make per day," he says. "Making a small number of key decisions well is more important than making a large number of decisions. If you shortchange your sleep, you might get a couple of extra 'productive' hours, but that productivity might be an illusion."

Sheets

What goes on your mattress can be just as important as the mattress itself. After all, your sheets come in direct contact with your skin every single night. Whether it's splurging on silk pillowcases or 1,800-thread-count sheets, it can be worth it to spend a little more.

Luggage

Nothing's worse than having your luggage fall apart in the middle of the airport or, worse, in a crowded street in a foreign country. Invest in a quality suitcase that will withstand all of your travels.

Furniture that you use on a daily basis

While finding a comfortable bed that allows you to get enough sleep comes with obvious health benefits, don't neglect the rest of the furniture you use every day. The dresser you got off Craigslist for free might not come with a numerical price, but the annoyance of trying to close a broken drawer every day could quickly start to drag down your mood.

Professional hair coloring

It only takes one disastrous at-home dye job to understand why it's worth it to leave color to the pros.

Getty Images

Organic produce — sometimes

If you're trying to decide when to splurge on organic items and when to hold back, the Environmental Working Group's annual "Dirty Dozen" list is generally a good guideline.

The list is composed of the top 12 foods — including spinach, strawberries and tomatoes — that "tested positive for a number of different pesticide residues and contained higher concentrations of pesticides than other produce," according to the EWC.

A warm winter jacket

Saving a few bucks will most certainly not be top of mind when you're freezing on a snowy winter day. Invest in a warm coat that will outlast harsh winters for years, or even decades.

Man running, more room to run
Getty Images

Good running shoes

A good pair of shoes can easily cost $100 or more. But even beginners should regularly replace their shoes. Running on old soles can lead to injuries such as shin splints, runner's knee and IT band syndrome, which take months to heal.

The experts at Runner's World recommend replacing your shoes every 300 to 500 miles. For runners who average 20 miles a week, that's two or three times per year.

Soft toilet paper

For obvious reasons.

Don't miss: A Twitter employee earning $160,000 in San Francisco says he's scraping by