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Head of GM's Maven car-sharing service: We won't threaten the automaker's core business

  • GM's Maven car-sharing service is not a threat to its core business — selling vehicles, Julia Steyn tells CNBC.
  • "We view this is as very complementary to our core business," Steyn says.
  • GM launched Maven in NYC on Monday.

General Motors car-sharing operation is not a threat to its core business — selling vehicles, the company's vice president of urban mobility, Julia Steyn, told CNBC on Monday.

Steyn's comment on "Squawk on the Street" came the same day GM launched its Maven car-sharing service in New York City, which lets members rent vehicles for up to 28 days. The company started Maven in January 2016 and has 35,000 members in 13 U.S. cities.

"We view this is as very complementary to our core business," said Steyn, who is head of Maven. "Our consumers are changing their preferences. They consume transportation as a service, especially in the big metropolitan areas like New York."

She continued, "To get customers excited about the cars that GM produces in an innovative way, this is huge."

Steyn said the car service, which has big markets in Chicago, Washington and San Fransico, will grant members a car for under $100 a day. The company will take care of insurance and fuel costs. She said members find a car via their smartphones parked in various locations around the city.

"You seamlessly open your door with a phone and you just get in and go," Steyn said.

The company will also loan cars on a short-term basis to the ride-share industry, Steyn said. "You can drive for Lyft, you can drive for Uber ... drive for delivery services like Grubhub and Instacart," she said.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report.