Money

The 2 things Warren Buffett always carries in his wallet

Maverick Carter and Warren Buffett joke around courtside with Buffett's wallet during the 2008 State Farm Basketball Challenge exhibition game.
Ethan Miller | Getty Images
Maverick Carter and Warren Buffett joke around courtside with Buffett's wallet during the 2008 State Farm Basketball Challenge exhibition game.

Legendary investor Warren Buffett is the fourth richest person in the world and controls a fortune of more than $73 billion, according to Bloomberg. But for all his success, he's also surprisingly sentimental.

GOBankingRates asked the Oracle of Omaha what he keeps in his wallet, and he revealed two items he never removes. The first is a collection of photos, both of his children and grandchildren as kids. The second is a $50 bill from a bank Berkshire Hathaway once owned in Rockford, Ill., signed by the owner.

"They issued their own currency, so I carry that around for good luck," Buffett told GOBankingRates.

In the past, Buffett has also kept his wallet full of $100 bills, a card that allows him to eat for free at any McDonald's in Omaha, Neb. and an American Express card from 1964.

Buffett's wallet isn't the only place where he stores meaningful items. In his office, Buffett not only works at the same desk his father once used, but he keeps the same model train on it that his dad did.

It's a subtle reminder of the man Buffett considers his hero.

"I never saw my dad do anything as — in his entire life that — you wouldn't feel good about being on the front page of the paper," he told Charlie Rose during a 2012 office tour with CBS. "He was a terrific human being."

On the walls of his office, you'll find framed copies of old New York Times articles and an award certificate from a Dale Carnegie course.

The articles, which detail the Panic of 1907 and the Great Depression, serve as cautionary tales for Buffett. "I wanted to put on the walls days of extreme panic in Wall Street just as a reminder that anything can happen in this world," he says in HBO's documentary, "Becoming Warren Buffett."

The certificate holds a more personal meaning: It reminds him of the course that allowed him to overcome his extreme fear of public speaking, which Buffett says changed the course of his entire life.

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