Trump's Dubai business associates to build Versace-branded tower block in London

  • Luxury real estate developer DAMAC International is building a Versace-branded 50-storey skyscraper in London.
  • DAMAC International has developed the Trump International Gulf Club Dubai and Trump-branded luxury villas.
  • The prime central London property market is recovering from a recent slowdown.
A view over the financial district and St Paul's Cathedral towards the west of the city at sunrise in London.
Getty Images
A view over the financial district and St Paul's Cathedral towards the west of the city at sunrise in London.

A subsidiary of Dubai's luxury real estate developer DAMAC International is building a 50-storey skyscraper in the U.K.'s capital city in partnership with Italian fashion house Versace called AYKON London One.

"AYKON London One is our premiere international development outside of the Middle East and a landmark project for the UK's capital," said Hussain Sajwani, Chairman of DAMAC, in a press release published Monday.

"The project continues to garner interest from investors who appreciate such a niche investment opportunity and seek premium branded real estate in one of the most desirable cities in the world."

DAMAC International's subsidiary Nine Elms Property is building the Versace-branded property, a luxury development featuring 450 homes and four floors of office space. The development, situated in central London, is valued at 645 million euros ($826 million). It is the first property in Europe designed in partnership with Versace.

DAMAC International is best known for its links to The Trump Organisation, the business run by Donald Trump until his election as U.S. president. DAMAC International has developed the Trump International Gulf Club Dubai, as well as Trump-branded luxury villas in the Middle East worth 2.96 million dirhams ($805,858).

The development comes as prices for prime central London property are forecast to recover from a recent slowdown. Price growth for the sector peaked at 24 percent year on year in 2010, but is now down to single-digits.

"We've seen some deceleration and certainly negative movements over the recent past as a result of a range of factors… but the important point is it's the most international market in the U.K.," Adam Challis, head of residential research for EMEA at JLL, told CNBC's Street Signs on Tuesday.

"As a result it's affected by a whole range of factors that are beyond domestic economic performance or domestic demand for housing. For many people around the world they look at it sometimes as a safe haven, but also that long-term outperformance (something like 7 or 8 percent per annum over the last three decades) is something that attracts many."

The slowdown in London's property market was due to several factors, including Brexit fears, changes to stamp duty (a U.K. property transaction tax) and political uncertainty, according to Elliot Castle, founder of U.K. home buying company, webuyanyhome.com.

"It does not seem to be showing much sign of a full recovery just yet. It would appear the buoyancy and growth previously seen in the London market may take a little longer to fully recover," he told CNBC via email.

However, London remains an attractive location for developers.

"London continues to be a thriving city with one of the most robust economies in the world and a shortage of housing. Although there is a price adjustment in the market, I don't envisage a slowdown in the number of new developments," Castle said.

Prime central London house prices fell 2 percent last year, but will grow 2 percent in 2017, 4 percent in 2018 and 5 percent the year after that, according to forecasts published on Monday by U.K. property services group Countrywide.

"Economic conditions for households will remain challenging over the next year as inflation eats into budgets and interest rates begin to rise," said Fionnuala Earley, Countrywide's chief economist, in a press release.

"But we expect the UK economy to recover and wage growth to pick up in response to global growth. That, combined with a continued lack of housing supply, will help to support house prices. "

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