Money

Why Mayweather is expected to make millions more than McGregor during Saturday's fight

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Mike Stobe | Getty Images

Saturday's "Fight of the Century" between the undefeated Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Conor McGregor, a UFC fighter making his professional boxing debut, is expected to break viewership records and be the most lucrative match in the history of the sport.

The Los Angeles Times projects it will bring in $662 million in revenue.

Exactly how much each fighter will take home remains unclear. They have agreed to a baseline percentage split, which remains confidential until the weigh-in Friday evening, but it's understood that Mayweather received the better end of the deal, according to the newspaper.

The Los Angeles Times notes: "Terms of this deal have not been revealed, but it's certain that Mayweather will earn the lion's share of the purse and pay-per-view money after raking in more than $200 million for the record-selling Pacquiao bout alone."

The 40-year-old has the leverage. He is a five-division world champion with a record of 49 wins and zero losses. He's coming out of retirement for the fight. And of course, he is the favorite. Bettors are throwing down millions on him.

Telegraph expects Mayweather could bring home around $230 million, closer to what he made for his fight in 2015 against former seven-division champion Manny Pacquiao.

In a recent interview, Mayweather told late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel that he might also place a bet on himself, although he was probably joking.

Despite his known seven-figure gambling habits, Mayweather is too superstitious to invest in his own fight, ESPN reported.

No matter who wins on Saturday, both fighters expect to have record paydays. Only one, though, will take home the "Money Belt," made of over three pounds of gold, alligator skin and more than 4,000 diamonds, sapphires and emeralds.

It's believed to be the most expensive trophy in the history of the sport, perfect for what will be its most valuable night.

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