Weather & Natural Disasters

See photos of Houston's desperate evacuations

Thousands of Houston residents are fleeing rapidly rising floodwaters as remnants of Hurricane Harvey continue to pour rain on already deluged streets.

The Addicks Reservoir overtopped its dam Tuesday morning, cresting above its 108-foot lip and spilling into surrounding neighborhoods. The reservoir level had been climbing at 4 inches an hour, according to the Houston Press. Just after 1 p.m., ET, it stood at 108.51 feet, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System.

On Monday night, more than 17,000 Texans sought refuge in shelters, according to the American Red Cross.

Here are some of the evacuation scenes unfolding in the Houston area, amid record rainfall.

Addicks Reservoir's uncontrolled overflow

Water from Addicks Reservoir flows into neighborhoods as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston.
David J. Phillip | AP

Residents wade through floodwaters in Beaumont Place, Houston

Residents wade through flood waters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Beaumont Place, Houston, Texas, on August 28, 2017.
Jonathan Bachman | Reuters

Saving what matters

Laquanta Edwards holds her one year old daughter Ladaja (R) and nine-month-old son LaDarius after they arrived to high ground by boat due to floods caused by Tropical Storm Harvey along Tidwell Road in east Houston, Texas, August 28, 2017.
Adrees Latif | Reuters

Laquanta Edwards holds her 1 year old daughter, Ladaja (R), and 9-month-old son, LaDarius, after they arrived to high ground by boat due to floods caused by Tropical Storm Harvey along Tidwell Road in east Houston.

Streets are raging rivers

A person walks through a flooded street with a dog after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Many abandoned their homes

People walk down a flooded street as they evacuate their homes after it the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Volunteers came from all directions to offer help

An evacuee is helped to dry land after her home was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Evacuees are using everything from airboats to pool floats to escape 

Dean Mize holds children as he and Jason Legnon use an airboat to rescue people from homes that are inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Dean Mize holds children as he and Jason Legnon use an airboat to rescue people from homes that are inundated with flooding.

Contaminated waters make familiar scenes look foreign

People make their way out of a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas
Getty Images

As waters rise, more vulnerable residents will need rescue

Houston Police SWAT officer Daryl Hudeck carries Catherine Pham and her 13-month-old son Aiden after rescuing them from their home surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, in Houston.
David J. Phillip | AP

Houston Police SWAT officer Daryl Hudeck carries Catherine Pham and her 13-month-old son Aiden after rescuing them from their home surrounded by floodwaters.

Convention Center serves as emergency shelter

Children watch videos as people seek shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, TX on Monday, Aug 28, 2017.
Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty Images

By Monday night, officials said some 7,000 people were taking refuge in the Red Cross' main shelter, the George R. Brown Convention Center. It was originally intended to house up to 5,000 people.

Evacuees fill up cots at the George Brown Convention Center that has been turned into a shelter run by the American Red Cross to house victims of the high water from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images
Related Tags