Top Stories
Top Stories
Weather & Natural Disasters

Extraordinary photos of survival in Houston

Residential neighborhoods near the Interstate 10 sit in floodwater in the wake of Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Marcus Yam | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

Five days after Harvey came ashore near Corpus Christi, Texas, record-setting rainfall in Houston continues to push floodwaters higher and higher.

Hurricane Harvey turned interstate highways into rivers and put numerous subdivisions around Houston under half a dozen feet or more of water. The most powerful hurricane to hit Texas in more than 50 years, Harvey lingered along the Gulf Coast, drenching the region with a year's worth of rain in the span of a week.

These photos give an intimate look at the current efforts to rescue residents and shelter evacuees.

Houston suburbs under immense amounts of floodwater

A house sits completely submerged in flood water in the wake of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas, on Aug. 29, 2017.
Marcus Yam | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

Two reservoirs near Houston surpassed record levels Tuesday, flooding nearby suburban homes. While the Addicks Reservoir breached the top of its emergency spillway and began flowing uncontrolled, the water levels have not reached the 109.5 foot level that U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Galveston Col. Lars Zetterstrom said would cause "larger flows of water" to go around the ends of the dam.

More than 4,000 people rescued by emergency responders

Police and volunteers rescue residents flooded by the San Jacinto river in Kingwood, Texas.
The Washington Post | Getty Images

Texans by the tens of thousands are evacuating flooded neighborhoods, often with the assistance of more than 12,000 National Guard members. Police and volunteers continue to provide support, helping rescue residents from the high water.

Texas Army National Guard members Sergio Esquivel, left, and Ernest Barmore carry 81-year-old Ramona Bennett after she and other residents were rescued from their Pine Forest Village neighborhood due to high water from Hurricane Harvey August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Dump trucks helping evacuations

Rescue workers and volunteers help residents make their way out of a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water following Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Harris County officials asked for high-water vehicles and boats to help rescue workers and dozens arrived in many forms to provide assistance.

Tragedy has become an unavoidable reality among evacuees

An evacuee holding two dogs reacts after his rescue by Texas National Guardsmen from severe flooding due to Hurricane Harvey in Cypress Creek, Houston, August 28, 2017.
Capt. Martha Nigrelle | U.S. Army National Guard | Reuters

Here an evacuee holding two dogs reacts after his rescue by Texas National Guardsmen, after severe flooding forced him out of Cypress Creek in Houston.

Some residents remain hunkered down in flooded homes

Matthew Koser looks for important papers and heirlooms inside his grandfather's house after it was flooded by heavy rains from Hurricane Harvey August 29, 2017 in the Bear Creek neighborhood of west Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Some residents, such as Matthew Koser, here in his grandfather's Bear Creek home, waited out the storm even as floodwaters rose. State officials said Wednesday morning that close to 49,000 homes had suffered flood damage, with more than 1,000 destroyed.

Evacuation centers overcrowded as water levels continue to rise

People take shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images

Locations such as the George R. Brown Convention Center were at or beyond capacity after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city.

Donations continue to add up for Harvey emergency aid

Madison Hairston searches for items for her children two-year-olds Justice and Jack at an evacuation shelter after their neighborhood was flooded with rain water following Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Channelview, Texas.
Getty Images

Support for the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and other groups continues to pour in as organizations and celebrities lead fundraising campaigns for Houston's evacuees.

Shannie Lipsie relaxes in the Channelview High School gym which has been turned in to an evacuation shelter for victims of flooding following Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Channelview, Texas.
Getty Images

Families find solace in safety

Mark Ocosta and his baby Aubrey Ocosta take shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Getty Images
Maria Lopez plays with her son Rafael Lopez, 3, in the warehouse at Gallery Furniture where they have been staying after evacuating their flooded home over the weekend, in Houston, Texas, August 29, 2017.
Nick Oxford | Reuters

Recovery bringing Houston's rebuilding into view

A aerial view of downtown on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Marcus Yam | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

The National Hurricane Center on Tuesday afternoon said a record 51.88 inches of rain had fallen in Texas due to Harvey, a record for the continental United States. Plans to rebuild the fourth most populous city in the U.S. are beginning to form as the water recedes and recovery continues.