Leadership

3 strategies to deal with a boss who micromanages you

A micromanaging boss hovers over the day-to-day of his or her workers.
A micromanaging boss hovers over the day-to-day of his or her workers.

It's common to work for a boss who micromanages you each day at the office.

That's according to Danny Shteinberg, co-founder and CMO of career site Workey. He tells CNBC Make It that a micromanager supervises an "excessive" amount, constantly checks the work performance of employees and hovers over day-to-day tasks of his or her workers.

Millennials are quick to be annoyed by micromanaging bosses because they value independence and responsibility, says Shteinberg. Having a boss who controls every minor aspect of your work can make you feel undervalued, which may lead to a decline in your quality of work.

So what should you do if you have a boss who hovers over you? Shteinberg gives these three key tips:

1. Keep your manager in the loop

Shteinberg says that micromanagement often stems from a boss lacking confidence in your work. "The key is to gain trust and secure a trustful relationship," he says.

Keeping your boss up to speed on what you're doing shows that you are organized and on top of things, which can go a long way in securing trust, says Shteinberg.

2. Evaluate your performance

"Be reflective," he says. "Give yourself an honest assessment of how you perform." Evaluating whether you're truly up to par, can show you whether your boss has a reason to micromanage you.

Perhaps your work isn't consistently excellent, says Shteinberg. "Evaluate yourself. Understand your manager's intentions and motives and acknowledge them."

3. Speak with your manager

Take the initiative to have a one-on-one with your boss, says Shteinberg.

Speak to your manager in a friendly and positive way and ask for feedback and tips on how you can improve your work.

Most importantly, says Shteinberg, "showcase how you care about the company mission and show that you want to contribute to the company's goals and success."

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