Check out these fun new camera tricks in Apple's iOS 11

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Tech Guide

Check out these fun new camera tricks in Apple's iOS 11

Use the new camera features in iOS 11
Todd Haselton | CNBC
Use the new camera features in iOS 11
  • iOS 11 has new photo effects you can play with
  • You can loop photos, make them bounce or create long exposure shots
  • CNBC will walk you through how to use the new features in this guide

Apple released new software for iPhones and iPads a week ago that has a lot of fun new features.

There are plenty of tweaks to the camera app, but one of my favorites is tucked away. You can use it to interact and change with live photos like never before.

You'll need to update to iOS 11 before taking advantage of this guide. Once you're there, proceed.

Snap a live photo

Turn on Live photos
Todd Haselton | CNBC
Turn on Live photos

Live photos, which record a short clip of action when you snap a picture, are typically on but can be toggled by pressing the circular button on the side of your camera screen. Once it's on, try to take a picture of a moving object, like your child jumping into the swimming pool. This will make the effects we'll walk you through even more fun.

Add effects, like the loop option

This is the new Loop option
Todd Haselton | CNBC
This is the new Loop option

Now, open your live photo by visiting the Apple Photos app. Tap it and then swipe up. You'll be presented with a new list of effects. In this photo, which I took during a weekend trip in Chicago, the image loops so that the statue looks like it's constantly spitting water.

Here's bounce

This is the bounce option
Todd Haselton | CNBC
This is the bounce option

If you select the bounce option, it'll move the subject in your live photo back and forth. This is particularly cool if someone is jumping into a pool. In this shot, I'm just dropping something on to my desk.

This is long exposure

Here's a look at long exposure
Todd Haselton | CNBC
Here's a look at long exposure

Long exposure works best when you keep the camera perfectly still and try to capture motion. A lot of photographers use it to capture a streak of car lights on a road or highway, or what appears to be a foggy or blurred waterfall. Here, you can see I used it to show motion of kayaks and boats moving under a bridge in Chicago.