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Tony Robbins reveals 3 tips that made him a megamillionaire

Tony Robbins knows a thing or two about growing a business. He made his first million by the age of 24 and eventually built a personal brand that would allow him to rub elbows with the likes of Bill Clinton, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and Oprah Winfrey. He is now a founder or investor in more than 30 businesses — including an upscale resort in the Island of Fiji and Major League Soccer's Los Angeles Football Club — with a combined annual revenue of $5 billion. Now the business strategist's net worth is estimated by Wealth-X to be at least $440 million. Here he shares three nuggets of wisdom that helped him along the way.

1. Achieve a 'beautiful state.'

The first step in being successful is managing your emotions, Robbins says. He teaches his clients to achieve what he calls a "beautiful state" — in other words, a perennially peaceful mood. That means never expecting anything from anyone — so instead of being disappointed when things don't work out, you'll remain the cool-headed leader who guides her team to victory amid adversity. "Emotions are contagious," Robbins says. Panicked leaders are bound to transmit that panic to their employees, while leaders who have attained a beautiful state will help their businesses by passing on their positive mind-set.

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2. Remember that language is key. 

"Vocabulary transforms the way you feel," Robbins says. People who consistently use negative language are likely to feel irritated all the time. If instead you want to feel productive or accomplished in your work, adopt a parlance that propels you forward. In order to do this, however, you need to be cognizant of the emotions certain words elicit from you. Focus on the positives — even down to individual words — and try to get rid of the negatives.

3. Surround yourself with leaders.

One of the biggest lessons Robbins has learned was how to delegate tasks and stop micromanaging his team. "I think this is the trap that most entrepreneurs get into," he says. In order to effect the change he wanted, he had to resist the urge to do everything himself. Robbins recommends checking your ego at the door and surrounding yourself with doers. This change, he says, allowed him to direct his team more strategically and start growing his business significantly.

— By Guadalupe Gonzalez, Inc.com