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GoPro shows off two new cameras, Hero 6 and the Fusion, in a move for more shareable videos

Key Points
  • GoPro announced two new cameras Thursday.
  • Shares were slightly down Thursday in advance of the announcement.
  • The two new cameras are already listed in the company's online store.
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GoPro CEO: New Hero 6 Black camera is in another league

GoPro announced two new cameras Thursday, the Hero 6 and the Fusion.

The Hero 6 camera features 4K footage at 60 frames per second, internal stabilizing technology, and a new, custom-designed processor powering the device, said CEO Nick Woodman at an event to show off the new devices.

The Fusion has cameras mounted on the front and back, enabling 360-degree footage and VR capabilities. The camera also introduces what the company calls Overcapture, allowing the user to select a specific perspective from the spherical feed for a more limited view and shareable video.

"This is a very powerful camera that can pump out very high frame rates for incredible visual slow motion effects," Woodman told CNBC's "Power Lunch " after the event.

The CEO pushed back on criticism of a dying market and said the company is seeing sales growth in several of its cameras, especially the more premium models.

"Hero 6 Black is just in another league," Woodman said.

The two cameras were already listed in the company's online store before the announcement by Woodman. The Hero 6 is available for purchase now, Woodman said, and the Fusion is available for preorder and will start shipping in November.

The struggling action-camera maker has been clawing its way back from massive market declines since the second half of 2015. The stock, once priced at $98, was trading slightly down at around $11 in advance of the announcement.

GoPro reported profitable Q3 revenue estimates in September, projecting $290 million to $310 million in revenue and gross margins at 36 to 38 percent.

The new cameras come almost exactly a year after the release of the Hero 5.

CNBC's Matthew J. Belvedere contributed to this report.