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Las Vegas massacre suspect Stephen Paddock committed suicide, police say

  • Stephen Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada, has been identified as the suspected gunman in the Las Vegas massacre.
  • Police say he killed himself before they reached him.
  • He had no known connection to terrorism, investigators say.
  • At least 58 people were killed and more than 500 were injured, police say.

The suspected gunmen in the Las Vegas shooting has been identified as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, Nevada.

Read CNBC's full Las Vegas shooting coverage here.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said that the shooter was found dead in a room on the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay in an apparent suicide. Lombardo said Paddock opened fire from the room, and there were no other shooters. Police said he had no known connection to terrorism.

"We have no idea what his belief system was," Lombardo said.

At least 58 people were killed and more than 500 were sent to hospitals after the gunman opened fire on more than 22,000 concertgoers in Las Vegas late Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Lombardo said the police department had located a number of firearms in the room he occupied in the hotel. Officers also carried out a search on Paddock's residence in Mesquite, 90 miles northeast of the hotel.

Paddock was not known to the federal authorities, but was known to local law enforcement, according to NBC News. Police confirmed Paddock was the son of bank robber Patrick Benjamin Paddock, who was on the FBI's Top 10 most wanted list for over a decade until 1977. The original FBI posting described the elder Paddock as "psychopathic ... with suicidal tendencies."

Several police officials and a casino executive told NBC News that Paddock had gambled more than $10,000 per day multiple times over the past several weeks. The reports do not reveal if, or how much, Paddock won or lost on those days.

A file photo of Stephen Paddock who was the confirmed shooter in Las Vegas.
A file photo of Stephen Paddock who was the confirmed shooter in Las Vegas.

Investigators said they located a woman who had been traveling with Paddock, Marilou Danley.

Danley was not with Paddock when he checked into Mandalay Bay, but he had used some of her identification papers, Lombardo said. He said police "have had a conversation with her," and that "at this time" Danley was not believed to have been involved.

The shooting took place at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival across the road from the Mandalay Bay on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip.

Videos posted on social media showed large crowds ducking for cover amid sustained bursts of shooting, apparently from a semi-automatic weapon.

Lombardo said he does not believe there were any other attackers and that reports on social media of multiple shooters and explosives used were false.

The FBI requested that anyone with video or photos regarding the shooting call 800-225-5324.

During the shooting, police told people to avoid heading to the south end of the Strip and said it was investigating an active shooter. Police said Las Vegas Boulevard was shut down at Tropicana, southbound past Russell Road.

The number of dead surpassed the death toll in the June 12, 2016, rampage at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, where 49 people were slain. Police said that two on-duty officers were among those injured: One was in stable condition after surgery and the other sustained minor injuries.

Flights were briefly halted at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport. Just before 1 a.m. Sunday, McCarran tweeted that "limited flight activity" had resumed but travelers should expect ongoing delays.

'Pandemonium'

Jon Bessett, one of the attendees at the concert, described the scenes as "pandemonium." He told NBC News that around 10 p.m. Sunday, he heard gunshots but country music star Jason Aldean and his band continued playing. Further gunshots followed and the band ran off stage.

A Las Vegas Metropolitan Police officer stands in the intersection of Las Vegas Boulevard and Tropicana Ave. after a mass shooting at a country music festival nearby on October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Getty Images
A Las Vegas Metropolitan Police officer stands in the intersection of Las Vegas Boulevard and Tropicana Ave. after a mass shooting at a country music festival nearby on October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

"Everyone was running, people were getting trampled," Bessett said. He then ran out over to the Luxor hotel nearby but still had friends at the concert, Bessett said.

"We ran as quick as we could into hotel and tried to get on the elevator but couldn't get in.

Chilling videos on social media show Aldean running off stage. He posted on Instagram shortly after informing people that him and his crew were safe.

"My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone involved tonight. It hurts my heart that this would happen to anyone who was just coming out to enjoy what should have been a fun night," Aldean wrote on Instagram.

Mandalay Bay, which is owned by MGM Resorts, was on lockdown during the shooting, according to one social media user.

The hotel and casino later released a statement on its official Twitter account.

Clarification: The shooting in Las Vegas was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.