Careers

Ivanka Trump: The US is 'not retaining the best talent for the jobs that we need'

Ivanka Trump, daughter and adviser of U.S. President Donald Trump talks during a panel at the W20 Summit in Berlin on April 25, 2017. The conference aims at building support for investment in women's economic empowerment programs
Maurizio Gambarini | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images
Ivanka Trump, daughter and adviser of U.S. President Donald Trump talks during a panel at the W20 Summit in Berlin on April 25, 2017. The conference aims at building support for investment in women's economic empowerment programs

Ivanka Trump says that a flawed immigration system is threatening America's ability to secure the best talent for in-demand jobs.

During a Monday panel at Fortune's Most Powerful Women Summit, the first daughter addressed the impact that deporting thousands of Dreamers as part of ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, might have on the future workforce.

"I personally am of the opinion — the President has stated this — that we have to figure out a good solution that protects these innocent people, many of whom were brought to this country as children," Trump said.

She also said that immigration reform is the right approach for protecting Dreamers and ensuring that we secure the best workforce talent.

"I think that is the right approach because our system is flawed, and it is not equipped to handle the challenges," she said. "Our visa program is deeply flawed. We are not retaining the best talent for the jobs that we need and that has to fundamentally be reconsidered."

Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, arrives at a Gala Dinner at Deutsche Bank within the framework of the W20 summit on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany.
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Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, arrives at a Gala Dinner at Deutsche Bank within the framework of the W20 summit on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany.

According to a study from the Center for American Progress, the estimated loss of DACA workers could result in the U.S. losing $433 billion over the next 10 years.

As an entrepreneur and author of "Women Who Work: Rewriting The Rules For Success," this is not the first time the first daughter has spoken out about the issues facing America's workforce.

Earlier this year, in an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal, Trump emphasized the need for paid family leave to be available to all working Americans.

"By now, many are familiar with the benefits of paid family leave: Healthier children and parents in more tightly bonded families, greater financial stability and stronger attachment to the labor force are among the most important," she wrote.

Trump added that paid leave "will have an especially positive effect for women, who are far more likely than men to leave the workforce to provide unpaid care for a child."

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