Trump retweets far-right British group's shocking anti-Muslim videos

  • President Trump retweets three graphic anti-Islamic videos posted by Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of the ultra-right Britain First.
  • "It is wrong for the president to have done this," Prime Minister Theresa May's office says later.
  • The group was formed in 2011 by former members of the British National Party, another far-right, nationalist party
  • Its members campaign against multiculturalism and what they see as the Islamization of the country

President Donald Trump on Wednesday retweeted three graphic anti-Islamic videos by the deputy leader of one of the U.K.'s most far-right groups, drawing condemnation from Britain's prime minister's office.

"It is wrong for the president to have done this," Prime Minister Theresa May's office said in a statement.

The retweets did not include any Trump commentary.

The tweets were posted by Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of Britain First, whose members are banned from mosques in England and Wales.

"Britain First seeks to divide communities in their use of hateful narratives which peddle lies and stoke tensions," the statement from 10 Downing Street said. "This causes anxiety to law abiding people. British people overwhelming reject the prejudice rhetoric of the far-right, which is the antithesis of the values that this country represents; decency, tolerance and respect."

Before May's statement, the group was condemned by the opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders sought to deflect attention from the videos themselves, saying "whether it's a real video [or not], the threat is real." She did not explain what the "threat" is, although all three of the videos Trump tweeted claimed to be of Muslims.

"I'm not talking about nature of the video, I think you're focusing on [the] wrong thing," she told reporters. "The threat is real, that's what the president is talking about, is the need for national security, need for military spending, and those are very real things, and there's nothing fake about that."

Britain First was formed in 2011 by former members of the British National Party, a far-right, nationalist party. Its members campaign against multiculturalism and what they see as the Islamization of the country.

Twitter

The group claims to have a Christian ideology, conducting what they call "Christian patrols." Its members have attracted attention by entering several mosques around the country, telling members of the congregation to reject Islam. These actions led to the group being banned from mosques in parts of the country.

Britain First responded quickly to the Trump retweets, saying "GOD BLESS YOU TRUMP."

The mosque ban is not the only brush with the law that the group has had.

Its leader, Paul Golding, and Fransen were charged earlier this year with causing religiously aggravated harassment after the pair distributed leaflets in a county in southeast England during a trial of three Muslim men and a teenager.

This month, Fransen was charged with using threatening and abusive language during a speech at a rally in Northern Ireland.