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Billionaire Mark Cuban: Live the 3 Ws at work to win over your boss

Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban
Fort Worth Star-Telegram | Getty Images
Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban

Want to win over your boss and get ahead at work? Billionaire entrepreneur and "Shark Tank" judge Mark Cuban tweeted some advice to his more than seven million followers on Friday: Live by the three Ws at work.

Cuban was referencing an article by the Young Entrepreneurial Council (YEC), published on Youtern.com, a site that connects young talent with internships and mentors.

In the article, 11 young bosses provide insight on how to impress your millennial manager. Cuban agreed with one boss in particular who said she should never have to ask an employee what, why or when in regards to an assignment.

Millennials
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Referring to the questions as "the three Ws," BAM Communications founder Beck Bamberger says she never wants to wonder, "What are you doing? Why are you doing it? When will it be done?"

As the CEO of a communications firm, Bamberger says her company is constantly holding clients accountable and managing expectations. Communication is key to keeping everyone on the same page.

"Communicate these [questions] constantly to your clients, team and me, and you'll be golden," she said.

Cuban agreed with Bamberger and tweeted that her advice was "spot on."

Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder, also agrees that communication is key to winning over your boss.

"Clearly communicate the details of your assignments so your boss is more aware of what is on your plate," Haefner tells CNBC Make It. "You cannot assume that your boss understands the hours associated with assignments. Making him or her aware will help create mutually agreeable expectations."

In 2015, millennials like Bamberger became the largest population in the U.S. labor force, leading to more young professionals taking over leadership positions. Kerri Rogan, head of reliability improvement for the transit system company London Underground, says the key to helping colleagues get adjusted to a young manager is to demonstrate that you're there to help.

Young managers, says Rogan, should try not to challenge the technical knowledge of their more experienced colleagues.

"You need to build personal relationships," she says.

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to "Shark Tank," which features Mark Cuban as a panelist.

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