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Bob Bowman, influential Major League Baseball media executive, forced out after alleged misconduct: Report

  • Bob Bowman, an influential baseball media executive, was forced to step down as chief of MLB Advanced Media last month after years of misconduct, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.
  • According to the report, Bowman engaged in consensual sexual relationships with subordinates, propositioned co-workers and promoted a culture of heavy drinking outside the office.
  • In one incident, the Journal wrote that Bowman shoved an executive affiliated with the Boston Red Sox.
Bob Bowman
Michael Newberg | CNBC
Bob Bowman

Bob Bowman, an influential baseball media executive, was forced to step down as chief of MLB Advanced Media last month after years of misconduct, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.

Bowman led Major League Baseball's multibillion-dollar digital media empire for 17 years. According to the Journal, executives at the company had known for at least a decade about alleged troubling behavior.

According to the report, Bowman engaged in consensual sexual relationships with subordinates, propositioned co-workers and promoted a culture of heavy drinking outside the office. In one incident, the Journal wrote that Bowman shoved an executive affiliated with the Boston Red Sox.

Former MLB President Bob DuPuy and former MLB Commissioner Bud Selig were told that employees were concerned about Bowman's behavior at least 10 years ago, according to the Journal.

DuPuy would not comment and referred questions to MLB, the Journal article said. Rich Levin, spokesman for Selig, provided the Journal with a statement on his behalf, "It is highly inappropriate for the Commissioner Emeritus to publicly discuss any private conversations he has had with former employees."

In a statement to the Journal, Bowman said he took full responsibility for his "inappropriate behavior."

"The culture that started at BAM was hard working and driven. At times, it was also inappropriate and I take full responsibility," Bowman told the Journal. "This inappropriate behavior reflects my personal flaws and not someone else's. This behavior and my personal behavior were wrong. To those who felt the sting of my behavior, I am truly sorry. To my family, friends and business colleagues who have been steadfastly supportive of me, and whom I have embarrassed, I apologize."

In 2010, Bowman filed to run for governor of Michigan. He later opted against it.

Read the full report at The Wall Street Journal.