US Treasury yields tick upward investors gear up for Fed speeches

  • In Georgia, Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic said that the central bank may only need to raise rates twice in 2018 without significant pressure on prices.

  • Both San Francisco Fed President John Williams and Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren will be delivering separate remarks at Brookings Institution in Washington.

  • In December, the U.S. economy added 148,000 jobs, coming in below market estimates.

U.S. government debt yields ticked upward Monday, as investors turned their attention to the U.S. central bank space, where three officials are set to speak.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note rose to around 2.48 percent at 2:57 p.m. ET, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was down at 2.812 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

Symbol
Yield
 
Change
%Change
US 3-MO
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US 1-YR
---
US 2-YR
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US 5-YR
---
US 10-YR
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US 30-YR
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The state of the U.S. economy will be front and center Monday as leading members of the Federal Reserve speak at separate events.

In Georgia, Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic said that the central bank may only need to raise rates twice in 2018 without significant pressure on prices.

Both San Francisco Fed President John Williams and Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren will be delivering separate remarks at Brookings Institution in Washington.

Bostic and Williams are both 2018 voting members of the Federal Open Market Committee, whereas Rosengren is not.

As markets kick off the second trading week of 2018, investors will likely be mulling over the latest figures from the Labor Department. On Friday, markets rose sharply despite nonfarm payroll data coming in below market expectations.

In December, the U.S. economy added 148,000 jobs, compared to market estimates of 190,000, according to a Reuters poll.