Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg asks followers to call Congress to solve immigration reform

  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg asked his followers to call their congressmen and congresswomen to ask them to solve DACA immigration issues.
  • Though he is "optimistic" the problem will be fixed, he said there are 800,000 people who are "living in fear with no ability to plan for the future."
Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) 2016 CEO Summit in Lima, Peru.
Bloomberg | Getty Images
Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) 2016 CEO Summit in Lima, Peru.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is asking his followers implore Congress to resolve DACA recipients' immigration status.

DACA, or the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is a U.S. immigration policy that allowed people who entered the country before they were 16 prior to 2007 and stayed in the country illegally to get a work permit and two-year period where they would not be deported. The status does not allow for a path to citizenship. About 800,000 "dreamers" are in the program.

President Donald Trump ended DACA in September 2017, saying he wanted lawmakers to reform the process within 6 months. A U.S. district judge in San Francisco ruled DACA must stay in place while there are pending lawsuits regarding the end of the program, but the Trump administration will appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook page DACA recipients are in limbo while their legal status is being negotiated. Though he said he was "optimistic" there will be a resolution, he said there is a need fix it soon because people are "living in fear with no ability to plan for the future."

"This is a basic question of whether our government works," he wrote. "Can Congress come together and find a path forward, or will we default to forcing almost one million people out of their jobs and country?"

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg also wrote about DACA on her Facebook page on Tuesday, saying immigrants helped create the United States and make it stronger.

"The United States is not a cruel country," Sandberg wrote. "But what we're considering doing to Dreamers is cruel. They deserve the chance to earn citizenship and legal protection to keep them safe and keep their families together. And they deserve it now."

See Zuckerberg's full post below:

Every day that Congress doesn't act more DACA recipients are losing their status.

Dreamers are members of our communities, and there are 800,000 living in fear with no ability to plan for the future. Teachers with DACA don't know if they'll be allowed to teach in a few months -- but somehow we expect them to take care of our children. First responders with DACA don't know if they'll get to stay here -- yet they worked around the clock to save lives after the hurricanes in Texas and Florida.

This is a basic question of whether our government works. Can Congress come together and find a path forward, or will we default to forcing almost one million people out of their jobs and country?

I'm optimistic this will get solved. There's been some good bipartisan momentum on legislation recently. From my conversations with leaders in Congress, I believe they want to fix this, but we need to keep the pressure on so they know we'll hold them accountable. I've been calling members of Congress and you can help by calling your Congressman or Congresswoman too right now.

To learn more and get connected today, go to http://dreamers.fwd.us.