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Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: TIF, JNJ, ADBE, ULTA, WMT, NKE & more

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Check out which companies are making headlines before the bell:

Tiffany – The luxury goods retailer beat estimates by 3 cents with quarterly profit of $1.67 per share. Revenue also beat forecasts, and a same-store sales increase of 3 percent was slightly above the consensus estimate of 2.8 percent.

Hibbett Sports – The athletic apparel retailer beat estimates on both the top and bottom lines, and reported an unexpected increase in same-store sales.

Johnson & Johnson – The company has received a $2.1 billion offer for its LifeScan unit from private equity firm Platinum Equity. LifeScan makes blood glucose monitoring products, and Johnson & Johnson expects the deal to close by the end of the year if it accepts the offer.

Adobe Systems – Adobe beat estimates by 11 cents with adjusted quarterly profit of $1.55 per share, while the software company's revenue also beat estimates. Adobe's bottom line was driven by an increase in subscriptions for its Creative Cloud software suite and a rise in average revenue per user.

Ulta Beauty – Ulta fell 3 cents shy of forecasts with adjusted quarterly profit of $2.75 per share, although the cosmetics retailer's revenue did match forecasts. Ulta also posted an 8.8 percent increase in comparable store sales, slightly short of consensus estimates.

Kroger – Kroger announced a $1 billion share buyback program. The move supplements the supermarket operator's prior buyback authorization, which had about $76 million remaining.

Walmart – Walmart responded to accusations from a former executive by calling him a "disgruntled former associate," and said an investigation had found no indication that the company acted improperly. Former business development director Tri Huynh had said Walmart was issuing misleading e-commerce results.

Nike – Nike brand president Trevor Edwards has resigned from that post, and will service as an adviser to CEO Mark Parker until he retires in August. The athletic footwear and apparel maker also said that Parker will remain in his post beyond 2020.

Qualcomm – Ex-chairman Paul Jacobs is seeking funds for a buyout of the chip maker, according to multiple reports. The reported effort comes just days after President Trump blocked Broadcom's $142 billion bid for Qualcomm.

Wynn Resorts – Former CEO Steve Wynn may sell all or part of his stake in the casino operator, according to a regulatory filing. Wynn is the largest shareholder in the company, with an 11.8 percent stake.

Meredith – The company is exploring a sale of magazines Time, Fortune, Money, and Sports Illustrated following its acquisition of Time Inc. earlier this year, according to Reuters.

Broadcom – Broadcom reported adjusted quarterly profit of $5.12 per share, beating estimates by 7 cents, while the chip maker's revenue was slightly above Street forecasts. Broadcom's results were driven by higher demand for smartphone chips.

Jabil Circuit – Jabil reported adjusted profit of 66 cents per share, coming in 4 cents ahead of consensus forecasts. Revenue also topped estimates for the contract electronics manufacturer, which gets about a quarter of its total sales from Apple.

Overstock.com – Overstock shares are under pressure after the e-commerce company recorded a larger than expected loss and lower than expected revenue.

Zumiez – Zumiez fell eight cents short of estimates with quarterly profit of 82 cents per share, although the activewear maker did see sales beat forecasts and said it was poised for accelerated earnings growth for this year.

FireEye – FireEye remains on watch following a report by The Information that both Cisco and Symantec were interested in a possible acquisition of the cyber security software company.

The Buckle – The accessories retailer earned 87 cents per share for its latest quarter, 15 cents above forecasts, with revenue also beating estimates. Comparable store sales fell 3.2 percent, a slightly smaller drop than the consensus estimate of a 3.4 percent decline.