Careers

Here's what it takes to get into 11 of the best medical schools in the US

Harvard medical school professor and his students.
Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Harvard medical school professor and his students.

Becoming a doctor is a serious undertaking. It often requires four years of undergraduate school, four years of medical school and at least one year of residency, and not to mention years of research.

To make matters more complicated, medical schools can vary greatly. Some schools specialize in medical research and others excel in preparing students for medical practice. U.S. News & World Report assessed almost 100 medical schools to determine which schools are the very best at what they do.

Here are the five best medical research schools:

Sign at the entrance to the Mission Bay campus of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) medical center in San Francisco, California.
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images
Sign at the entrance to the Mission Bay campus of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) medical center in San Francisco, California.

5. University of California — San Francisco

Overall score: 79
Median undergrad GPA: 3.85
Median MCAT score: 517
Acceptance rate: 3.3 percent
NIH research grants (in millions): $555.30
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $51,916

3. New York University (tie)

Overall score: 80
Median undergrad GPA: 3.93
Median MCAT score: 521
Acceptance rate: 4.7 percent
NIH research grants (in millions): $381.90
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $56,764

3. Stanford University (tie)

Overall score: 80
Median undergrad GPA: 3.82
Median MCAT score: 519
Acceptance rate: 2.3 percent
NIH research grants (in millions): $408.80
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $57,150

2. Johns Hopkins University

Overall score: 82
Median undergrad GPA: 3.93
Median MCAT score: 519
Acceptance rate: 5.3 percent
NIH research grants (in millions): $593.00
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $57,230

1. Harvard University

Overall score: 100
Median undergrad GPA: 3.93
Median MCAT score: 517
Acceptance rate: 3.5 percent
NIH research grants (in millions): $1,523.10
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $61,535

Here are the six best medical schools for primary care:

5. Baylor College of Medicine (tie)

Overall score: 86
Median undergrad GPA: 3.92
Median MCAT score: 517
Acceptance rate: 4.1 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 57 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $32,823

5. Oregon Health and Science University (tie)

Overall score: 86
Median undergrad GPA: 3.73
Median MCAT score: 51
Acceptance rate: 3.8 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 45 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $69,831

4. University of California — Los Angeles

Overall score: 87
Median undergrad GPA: 3.75
Median MCAT score: 512
Acceptance rate: 3.2 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 53.00 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $51,739

3. University of Washington

Overall score: 95
Median undergrad GPA: 3.67
Median MCAT score: 508
Acceptance rate: 3.9 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 50.00 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $65,671

2. University of California — San Francisco

Overall score: 96
Median undergrad GPA: 3.85
Median MCAT score: 517
Acceptance rate: 3.3 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 44.1 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $51,916

1. University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill

Overall score: 100
Median undergrad GPA: 3.68
Median MCAT score: 511
Acceptance rate: 3.8 percent
Graduates entering primary care: 62 percent
Out-of-state tuition and fees: $56,484

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
BSPollard | Getty Images
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Harvard University was ranked the number one medical research school and for good reason. In 2017 alone, Harvard won $1,523,100,000 worth of research grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH).

University of North Carolina (UNC) topped U.S. News' list as the best medical school for preparing students for a career in primary care. A whopping 62 percent of UNC medical school graduates went on to practice medicine.

The hardest school to get into is Stanford University, where just 2.3 percent of applicants are accepted.

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