Apple's Tim Cook: It's not true that the iPhone isn't built in the US

  • Cook clarified his comments to say the flagship phones are assembled elsewhere, but said "there's equipment and manufacturing" all over the U.S.
  • President Donald Trump has touted Apple as one of the top many American companies investing at home.
  • Cook said Wednesday the company doesn't need "political pressure" to add U.S. jobs and said "we've already been doing that."
At Tuesday's quarterly earnings announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook will likely shed some light on how the business plans to bring the $285 billion it's holding overseas back into America.
John Gress | Reuters
At Tuesday's quarterly earnings announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook will likely shed some light on how the business plans to bring the $285 billion it's holding overseas back into America.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said Wednesday that the iPhone is in fact largely made in America.

He clarified his comments to say the flagship phones are assembled elsewhere, but said "there's equipment and manufacturing" all over the U.S.

President Donald Trump has touted Apple as one of the top many American companies investing at home. The company said in January that it planned to contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy over the next five years through taxes, capital investment and job creation.

Cook said Wednesday the company doesn't need "political pressure" to add American jobs and said, "we've already been doing that."

Cook made the comments in an interview with Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes, a day after Apple revealed a new affordable iPad model that supports Apple Pencil and revamped education software.

The company is hoping the new iPad, marketed primarily to schools, will help regain some of the education market share from Google and its Chromebook. Meanwhile, Apple is facing reports of iPhone "demand deterioration."

Cook said the hardware giant is looking to expand its domestic operations from its main hubs in California and Texas.

He said Apple wouldn't be launching a "contest" like Amazon has in its search for a second headquarters.

Apple doesn't want to put states and municipalities through the work only to be rejected, he said, a case that produces one winner and a lot of losers.

Cook also spoke broadly about the political climate, denouncing high college costs and reiterating his firm stance against the repeal of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which offers legal protections to child immigrants.

It's "unthinkable" that such changes are happening in the U.S., Cook said, adding that it's not an issue of "red or blue, conservative or liberal" — upholding DACA is a moral issue.

"I am very disappointed in both parties," he said.

Cook's full interview with Swisher and Hayes will air on MSNBC on April 6.

— Writing by CNBC's Sara Salinas, reporting by CNBC's Paayal Zaveri.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of MSNBC and CNBC.

WATCH:  Tim Cook on Facebook's data leak scandal: 'I wouldn't be in this position'