Yields rise after strong jobs data, Trump backtrack of Syria threat

  • New applications for U.S. unemployment benefits fall, hinting at a tight labor market despite a sharp slowdown in job growth in March.
  • President Trump appeared to temper his Syrian missile threat Thursday, tweeting that he never specified when an attack on Syria would take place.

U.S. government debt yields rose Thursday after jobless data suggested continued strength in the labor market and President Donald Trump backtracked on his Syrian missile threat.

The yield on the two-year note hit 2.346 percent, its highest level since March 21, when the two-year yielded as high as 2.366 percent.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, meanwhile, was higher at around 2.828 percent at 2:51 p.m. ET, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was higher at 3.039 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

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%Change
US 3-MO
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US 1-YR
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US 2-YR
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US 5-YR
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US 10-YR
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US 30-YR
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New applications for U.S. unemployment benefits fell last week, hinting at a tight labor market despite a sharp slowdown in job growth in March.

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped 9,000 to a seasonally adjusted 233,000 for the week ended April 7, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims falling to 230,000 in the latest week

The U.S. Treasury auctioned $13 billion in 29-year and 10-month bonds, a sale which saw solid demand. Direct bidders bought 14.6 percent, well above the 10-auction average of 8 percent.

On the central banking front, Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari is expected to take part in a Q&A in Minneapolis with Tim Worke, CEO of Associated General Contractors of Minnesota.

Kashkari's comments come hot on the heels of the latest minutes release by the Federal Open Market Committee. They revealed that central bank officials saw the economy growing at a solid pace, with inflation also rising.

Elsewhere, investors will be keeping an eye on politics, after President Donald Trump taunted Russia with the threat of imminent military action in Syria.

On Wednesday, markets had come under pressure after Trump appeared to criticize the Kremlin, for the country's support towards the Syrian President Bashar Assad, after a suspected chemical attack occurred in Syria over the weekend.

He appeared to temper that rhetoric Thursday, however, tweeting that he never specified when an attack on Syria would take place.

"Never said when an attack on Syria would take place. Could be very soon or not so soon at all! In any event, the United States, under my Administration, has done a great job of ridding the region of ISIS. Where is our "Thank you America?," President Trump said on social media Thursday.

— CNBC's Gina Francolla contributed to this report.