UK officials will summon Mark Zuckerberg to testify if he won't do so voluntarily

  • It would be the first governmental summons for Zuckerberg in the fallout of the Cambridge Analytica data leak and widespread concerns around user privacy.
  • Facebook last week sent CTO Mike Schroepfer to answer questions before a parliamentary committee.
  • But Schroepfer "failed to answer fully on nearly 40 separate points," Conservative MP Damian Collins wrote in the letter published Tuesday.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing regarding the company’s use and protection of user data on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 11, 2018.
Leah Millis | Reuters
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing regarding the company’s use and protection of user data on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 11, 2018.

U.K. officials said Tuesday they will summon Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to testify before Parliament the next time he's in British territory if he does not volunteer to do so.

It would be the first governmental summons for Zuckerberg in the fallout of the Cambridge Analytica data leak and widespread concerns around user privacy.

"It's worth noting that, while Mr. Zuckerberg does not normally come under the jurisdiction of the UK Parliament, he will do so the next time he enters the country," Damian Collins, a Conservative member of Parliament, wrote in a letter published Tuesday.

"There are over 40 million Facebook users in the UK and they deserve to hear accurate answers from the company he created and whether it is able to keep their users' data safe," Collins wrote.

Here's the full letter:

Facebook sent CTO Mike Schroepfer last week to answer questions before a parliamentary committee.

Schroepfer admitted during the hearing that Facebook did not read the terms of service of the app that improperly shared user data with Cambridge Analytica. He also testified that Facebook was investigating whether defense contractor Palantir had improper access to Facebook user data.

Collins' letter said Schroepfer "failed to answer fully on nearly 40 separate points."

Collins submitted 39 questions for written response in his letter, encompassing everything from the Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency to the number of "clicks or swipes" it takes to change personal privacy settings on a smartphone.

Facebook is expected to submit a response, including whether Zuckerberg will voluntarily testify, by May 11.

Facebook was not immediately available for comment following the publication of the letter.