Mark Cuban says he's giving more thought to running for president as speculation swirls around Howard Schultz

  • When asked whether he'd given more thought to a presidential bid, Cuban tells The New York Times in an email "Yes. But not willing to discuss at this point."
  • Cuban, an outspoken critic of President Trump, previously said his decision hinges on whether his wife and family would allow it.
  • Cuban's comment comes amid speculation that a number of business executives could run in 2020, including outgoing Starbucks chairman Howard Schultz.
Mark Cuban attends Shark Tank's Kevin O'Leary launches symposium celebrating global entrepreneurship at Casa Loma on April 5, 2018 in Toronto, Canada.
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Mark Cuban attends Shark Tank's Kevin O'Leary launches symposium celebrating global entrepreneurship at Casa Loma on April 5, 2018 in Toronto, Canada.

Billionaire investor Mark Cuban says he hasn't ruled out a presidential bid against President Donald Trump in 2020.

When asked on Monday whether he'd given more thought to the issue, the owner of the Dallas Mavericks and co-host of "Shark Tank" told The New York Times in an email "Yes. But not willing to discuss at this point."

Cuban, an outspoken critic of Trump, has previously said his decision hinges on whether his wife and family would allow it.

I would run as a "Republican before Democrat and most likely independent," Cuban said at The New York Times DealBook Conference in November.

"I think there is an incremental value for setting up an independent candidacy," he added at the time. "The benefit of being an independent is you go right to the golden ticket time, if I get enough support in the polls then I get to participate in the debates."

Cuban's latest comment comes amid growing speculation that a number of familiar business faces could make a bid for the White House in 2020.

The theory appeared to gain ground Monday after Howard Schultz, outgoing chairman and former chief executive of Starbucks, announced his intention to vacate his place on the board later this month.

A longtime supporter of former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton during her bid for president, Schultz told employees in a memo that he's considering several paths forward, including philanthropy and public service.

In an interview Tuesday on CBC's "Squawk Box," Schultz said: "There's a lot of things I can do as a private citizen other than run for the presidency of the United States."

"Let's just see what happens," he added.

Read The New York Times' full article here.

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to "Shark Tank," which features Mark Cuban as a panelist.